Legal Information: Nevada

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
August 6, 2021

What can I do if the abuser violates the order?

You can call the police, even if you think it is a minor violation. Violating a temporary order or the first-time violation of an extended order is a misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.1 A second violation of an extended order is a gross misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail and up to a $2,000 fine.2 A third violation of an extended order is a category D felony, which can be punished by between one and four years in jail and up to a $5,000 fine.3 Each act that constitutes a violation of the temporary or extended order may be prosecuted as a separate violation of the order.4

Nevada state law requires the police to fill out a report for all domestic violence-related calls.5 Make sure a police report is filed even if no arrest is made. It is a good idea to write down the name of the responding officer(s) and their badge number(s) in case you want to follow up on your case.

Another option is to file a violation petition in court and ask that the abuser be held in contempt of court for violating the order. If the judge finds him/her in contempt, the judge can order various penalties against the abuser.

For more information about contempt, including the difference between criminal contempt and civil contempt, go to our general Domestic Violence Restraining Orders page.

1 N.R.S. §§ 33.100(1), (2)(a); 193.150
2 N.R.S. §§ 33.100(2)(b); 193.140
3 N.R.S. §§ 33.100(2)(c); 193.130(2)(d)
4 N.R.S. § 33.100
5 N.R.S. § 171.1227(1)

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