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Legal Information: Nevada

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
November 13, 2019

What can I do if the abuser violates the order?

You can call the police, even if you think it is a minor violation. Violating a temporary order or the first-time violation of an extended order is a misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.1 A second violation of an extended order is a gross misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail and up to a $2,000 fine.2 A third violation of an extended order is a category D felony, which can be punished by between one and four years in jail and up to a $5,000 fine.3 Each act that constitutes a violation of the temporary or extended order may be prosecuted as a separate violation of the order.4

Nevada state law requires the police to fill out a report for all domestic violence-related calls.5 Make sure a police report is filed even if no arrest is made. It is a good idea to write down the name of the responding officer(s) and their badge number(s) in case you want to follow up on your case.

Another option is to file a violation petition in court and ask that the abuser be held in contempt of court for violating the order. If the judge finds him/her in contempt, the judge can order various penalties against the abuser.

1 N.R.S. §§ 33.100(1), (2)(a); 193.150
2 N.R.S. §§ 33.100(2)(b); 193.140
3 N.R.S. §§ 33.100(2)(c); 193.130(2)(d)
4 N.R.S. § 33.100
5 N.R.S. § 171.1227(1)