Legal Information: Nevada

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
March 26, 2018

How can an order for protection of children help my child?

A temporary or extended order can:

  • Tell the abuser to stay away from the home, school, business, or place of employment of the child and any other location specifically named by the court;
  • Prohibit the abuser from contacting, intimidating, threatening, or otherwise interfering with the child and any other person specifically named by the court, including members of the child’s family or household; and
  • Include other restrictions on the abuser that the court considers necessary to protect the child or to protect any other person specifically named by the court, including members of the child’s family or household.1

Note: If an abuser is criminally charged with certain crimes against your minor child, and is released from jail before trial or is found guilty or guilty but mentally ill during the trial, the court may issue a temporary or extended order with the restrictions listed above or include those restrictions as conditions for the release or criminal sentence of the abuser.2 Remember, if you are not sure about what happened in the criminal case, ask the prosecutor. By law, s/he has to inform you of the result of the case if you ask.3

1 N.R.S. § 33.400(2)
2 N.R.S. § 33.400(3)
3 N.R.S. § 33.440(1)