Legal Information: Nevada

Nevada Restraining Orders

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Restraining Orders

An order for protection is a legal order issued by a state court that requires one person to stop harming another as well as offering other protections. In Nevada, there are orders for protection against domestic violence, orders for protection against sexual assault, orders for protection against stalking and harassment, orders for protection against harassment in the workplace, and orders for protection of children.

Overview of Civil vs. Criminal Law

A quick overview of the legal system

The legal system is divided into two areas: civil law and criminal law. Separate courts govern (control) these two areas of the law.

One of the most confusing things about the legal system is the difference between civil cases and criminal cases. In domestic violence situations, there may be both civil and criminal cases occurring at the same time as a result of the same violent act. You may want to pursue both civil and criminal actions for maximum protection. The major differences have to do with who takes the case to court and the reason for the case.

Civil Law
In a civil domestic violence action, you are asking the court to protect you from the person abusing you. You are not asking the court to send that person to jail for committing a crime. However, if the abuser violates the civil court order, he may be sent to jail for the violation. In a civil case, you are the person bringing the case against the abuser and (in most circumstances), you have the right to withdraw (drop) the case if you want to.

Criminal Law
The criminal law system handles all cases that involve violations of criminal law such as harassment, assault, murder, theft, etc. A criminal complaint involves the abuser being charged with a crime. In a criminal case, the prosecutor (also called the district attorney) is the one who has control over whether the case against the abuser continues or not. It is the county/state who has brought the case against the abuser, not the victim. It is possible that if you do not want the case to continue (if you do not want to “press charges”), the prosecutor might decide to drop the criminal charges but this is not necessarily true. The prosecutor can also continue to prosecute the abuser against your wishes and could even issue a subpoena (a court order) to force you to testify at the trial.

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Orders for Protection Against Domestic Violence

An order for protection is a civil order that is designed to stop violent and harassing behavior and to protect you and your family from the abuser.

Basic info

What is the legal definition of domestic violence in Nevada?

This section defines domestic violence for the purposes of getting an order for protection.  Domestic violence includes:

  • Battery (physical violence including slapping, punching, strangulation, etc.),
  • Assault (attempting to use physical force against you or intentionally placing another person in reasonable fear of immediate bodily harm),
  • Using force or threats to make you do something that you don’t want to do or to not let you do something that you do want to do,
  • Sexual assault,
  • Doing one or more of these acts with the intent to harass you:
    • Arson,
    • Trespassing,
    • Larceny,
    • Destruction of private property,
    • Carrying a concealed weapon without a permit,
    • False imprisonment,
    • Injuring or killing an animal,
    • Stalking,
    • Illegally entering your home when you are not there or forcing his/her way into your home against your will in a way that may cause you harm.1

For these acts to be considered domestic violence, you have to have a specific relationship to the person doing the act.  See Who is eligible for an order of protection? for more information.

1 N.R.S. § 33.018

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What is an order for protection against domestic violence? What types of orders are there?

An order for protection is a written court order that is designed to stop violent and harassing behavior and to protect you and your children from the abuser. Orders for protection can also be known as protection orders or restraining orders.

There are two types of orders in Nevada:

A temporary order for protection is an order that can be granted based on your testimony or any evidence you present to the court in your application for a temporary or extended order for protection. If a judge finds that you or your family are in danger of being harmed, s/he can grant a temporary order within 1 judicial day of receiving your application. The judge would confirm A temporary order can last up to 30 days. However, if you file for an extended order at the same time that you file for the temporary order (or at any time while the temporary order is in effect), the temporary order will last until the date of your hearing for an extended order (which could be up to 45 days from the date you file for the extended order). If law enforcement is unable to serve the respondent within the 45 days before your hearing or if there is evidence that the respondent is hiding to avoid being served, the judge can postpone the hearing for 90 days - and then for another 90 days after that if necessary.1

Note: There can be a different way to get a temporary order rather than going to court to file it. If the abuser was arrested for domestic violence, you may be able to communicate with a judge by phone to request the order while the abuser is in police custody/jail. The judge can then issue an order and send it to where the abuser is in custody so that s/he can be served. The court would then mail you a copy of the order and have it filed in court within one business day. A judge should be available 24 hours/day, 7 days/week in counties whose population is 52,000 or more; in a county with less than 52,000 people, it is optional (not mandatory) for the county to make judges available 24 hours per day.2

An extended order for protection is awarded by a judge only after a hearing in which you and the abuser each have an opportunity to present evidence and tell your different sides of the story.3 An extended order lasts for up to one year.4 The expiration date should be on the first page of the order. Note: In Clark County, if there is divorce or custody case already pending, many of the domestic violence commissioners will only extend the order for protection to 60 days and not for the whole year.5

1 N.R.S. §§ 33.020(1)-(5); 33.080(1)
2 N.R.S. § 33.020(7)-(9)
3 N.R.S. § 33.020(3)
4 N.R.S. § 33.080(3)
5 Local Rule for the 8th District in Clark County, EDCR 5.22(k)

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What protections can I get in an order for protection?

A temporary order can:

  • Forbid further threats, harassment, or injury to you or your minor child either directly or through a third party;
  • Order the abuser to stay out of your home;
  • Prohibit the abuser from entering your place of employment, school, or other specified location;
  • Award you temporary legal custody of children;
  • Provide other relief the court considers necessary in an emergency situation;
  • Prohibit the abuser from physically injuring or threatening to injure any animal owned by you, your minor child, or the abuser (and from taking possession of any animal owned by you or your minor child) either directly or through someone else; and/or
  • Order anything else that is necessary.1

An extended order can grant everything mentioned above and the following additional things:

  • Award you custody of your children and force the abuser to pay child support;
  • Establish visitation arrangements and require supervision by a third party if necessary;
  • Order the abuser to make rental or mortgage payments on the home in which you are living;
  • Reimburse you for lost earnings and expenses due to you having to attend any hearing for an extended order;
  • Make arrangements for the possession and care of any animal owned or kept by either party or your minor child;
  • Order the abuser to pay all or part of the costs and fees you spent to file and get the order for protection;2
  • Force the abuser to turn over to law enforcement or sell/transfer any firearms to a licensed firearm dealer within 24 hours of service (receipt) of the order for protection and prevent him/her from having or buying firearms while the order is in effect.3 Before ordering this, the judge must consider:
    • any documented history of domestic violence;
    • whether the abuser has used or threatened to use a firearm to injure or harass you, your child, or any other person; and
    • whether the abuser has used a firearm while committing (or attempting to commit) any crime.
    • Note: Even if the judge orders that the abuser cannot have or possess a firearm, there could be an exception made to allow the abuser to use or possess a gun during his/her job. Three conditions must be met, however:
      • it is required by the employer that s/he use or have a firearm;
      • s/he only uses it while performing his/her job duties; and
      • the employer will store the firearm during any period when the abuser is not working.4

1 N.R.S. § 33.030(1)
2 N.R.S. § 33.030(2)
3 N.R.S. §§ 33.031(1); 33.033(1)
4 N.R.S. § 33.031(2),(3)

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Who can get an order for protection against domestic violence

Who is eligible for an order for protection against domestic violence?

Domestic violence, for the purpose of getting an order for protection, is when an abuser commits certain acts (as described in What is the legal definition of domestic violence in Nevada?) against one of the following people:

  1. The abuser’s spouse or ex-spouse;
  2. Anyone related to the abuser by blood or marriage;
  3. Someone with whom the abuser has/had a dating relationship;
  4. Someone with whom the abuser has a child in common;
  5. The minor child of any of the people described above; or
  6. The abuser’s minor child or any other person who has been appointed the custodian or legal guardian for the abuser’s minor child.1

If you fall into any of the above categories, you may be eligible to file for an order for protection against the abuser.  It doesn’t matter if the abuser is an adult (over 18) or a minor (under 18).

A parent or guardian can file for an order of protection for a child (under 18), an elderly person or anyone who is unable to file for themselves because of disability or hospitalization.

1 N.R.S. § 33.018(1)

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Can I get an order for protection against domestic violence against a same-sex partner?

How much does it cost to get an order for protection against domestic violence?

There are no fees for filing an order for protection against domestic violence or for getting a certified copy of the order.

Note: After the hearing, the judge may require the abuser to pay some or all court costs and fees.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.050(1), (4)

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Do I need an attorney to get an order for protection?

No, you do not need an attorney to file for an order for protection,1 but it is often better to have one.  It may be in your interest to hire an attorney, especially if the abuser is represented by one.  Go to our NV Finding a Lawyer page for legal referrals.  If you cannot find a lawyer through this link, a domestic violence organization in your area may be able to refer you to a different attorney or legal aid service that will take your case for free.  Additionally, often domestic violence organizations can help you through the process if you do not have an attorney.  To find an advocate or domestic violence organization in your area, please visit our NV Advocates and Shelters page.

1 N.R.S. § 33.050(2)(c)

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Steps for obtaining an order for protection

Step 1: File an application in court.

Go to the justice of the peace court or the district court and tell the court clerk that you want to fill out an application for an extended protection order and for a temporary order if you are in immediate danger.  (Go to our NV Courthouse Locations page for the location nearest you.  Go to our NV Download Court Forms page to see if the forms are available online.)

The application must be “verified,” which means you might have to sign it in front of the court clerk or a notary.  Check with the court clerk before signing your papers.

Note: If the abuser has been arrested, you may be able to file for temporary order by telephone while the abuser is in police custody/jail.1 See What is an order for protection against domestic violence? What types of orders are there? for more information.

1 N.R.S. § 33.020(7)-(9)

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Step 2: Fill out the petition.

Carefully fill out the petition.  On the petition you will be the "applicant” and the abuser will be the "adverse party."  The court clerk or another person designated by the court can help you fill out the petition and any paperwork that needs to go with it for a temporary or extended order.  (The court clerk can also help fill out the paperwork for the response to a petition for a protection order if someone has filed against you.)  However, the court clerk or other designated party cannot provide legal advice.1

Write about the most recent incident(s) of violence, using descriptive language (slapping, hitting, grabbing, threatening, choking, etc.) that fits your situation.  Include details and dates, if possible.  Be specific.

There are also instructions available on the Nevada Supreme Court website for filling out the petition and the court clerk may also have printed instructions.  Click on “Domestic Violence - Application Instructions (Voluntary Forms)".

Note: If you do not want the abuser to know where you are staying or where you work, you may be able to keep this and certain other information confidential, which means that the abuser will not see it.  If so, specifically ask the court clerk or advocate how you can do this.

Most domestic violence prevention organizations can provide support for you while you go through this process.  To find help in your area, go to the NV Advocates and Shelters page under the Places that Help tab on the top of this page.

1 N.R.S. § 33.050(3)

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Step 3: A judge will consider your application.

After you complete the application, return it to the clerk. The clerk will forward it to a judge, and the judge will consider your application. The judge may issue you a temporary order based only on what you wrote in your application, or the judge may wish to ask you some questions in person1 during what is called an ex parte hearing. “Ex parte” means "from one side only." In this hearing, only you are in front of the judge, not the abuser. You will explain to the judge why you fear the abuser and feel that you need a temporary order for protection.

1 N.R.S. § 33.020(1)-(2)

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Step 4: Service of process

If you are granted a temporary order, the abuser has to be served with a copy of it so s/he knows what s/he is restricted from doing (i.e., contacting you, coming to your home, etc.).  The order is only effective once it is served.  If you apply for an extended order, the court will give you a hearing date where both you and the abuser have a right to be present.  The abuser must be “served” with this notice of the hearing so that s/he knows s/he must appear in court.1  If the abuser does not receive notice, the hearing will be rescheduled.  Talk to a court clerk about serving these papers, which is known as “service of process.”  The court may send the paperwork to law enforcement personnel to be served, or you may have to bring the temporary order and notice of hearing to the police or sheriff yourself.  There is no cost for law enforcement personnel to serve the abuser with the temporary order and notice of the hearing for the extended order.2  If law enforcement is not able to serve the abuser in person, there are other ways that law enforcement may be able to serve it (i.e., by delivering it to his/her work and mailing it).  For more information, you can go to our NV Statutes page and read section 33.065.  You cannot serve the papers yourself.

1 N.R.S. § 33.020(3)
2 N.R.S. § 33.060(2)

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Step 5: The hearing for an extended order

Nevada law states that a hearing must be held within 45 days of the court receiving your application for an extended order (but the hearing can be delayed twice for 90-day periods each if the abuser cannot be served before the scheduled hearing dates).1  However, if you get a temporary order for protection, the abuser may request that the hearing take place sooner than originally scheduled so that s/he can ask that the temporary order be dismissed or modified, so you may be given a new court date.  The abuser would only have to give you two days' notice of this hearing.2  You must go to all court hearings.  If you do not go to the hearing(s), your order can be dismissed.

At the hearing, you must prove that the abuser has committed an act(s) of domestic violence (as defined by the law).  You must also convince a judge that you need the protection and the specific things you asked for in the petition.  If the abuser does not show up for the hearing, the judge may still grant you an order for protection, or the judge may order a new hearing date.

We strongly suggest getting an attorney to represent you at the hearing, especially if you think the abuser will have one.  Go to our NV Finding a Lawyer page for legal referrals.  If you end up representing yourself, go to our Preparing Your Case section under the Preparing for Court tab for ways you can show the judge that you were abused.

1 N.R.S. § 33.020(4),(5)
2 N.R.S. § 33.080(2)

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After the hearing

Can the abuser have a gun?

Once you get a protection order, there may be laws that prohibit the respondent from having a gun in his/her possession.  There are a few places where you can find this information:

  • first, read the questions on this page to see if judges in Nevada have to power to remove guns as part of a temporary or final order;
  • second, go to our State Gun Laws section to read about your state’s specific gun-related laws; and
  • third you can read our Federal Gun Laws section to understand the federal laws that apply to all states.

You can read more about keeping an abuser from accessing guns on the National Domestic Violence and Firearms Resource Center’s website

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What should I do when I leave the courthouse?

These are some things you may want to consider after you have been granted an order for protection.  Depending on what you think is safest in your situation, you may do any or all of the following:

  • Review the order before you leave the courthouse. If something is wrong or missing, ask the clerk how to correct the order before you leave.
  • Make several copies of the order of protection as soon as possible.
  • Keep a copy of the order with you at all times.
  • Leave copies of the order at your workplace, at your home, at the children's school or daycare, in your car, with a sympathetic neighbor, and so on.
  • Give a copy to the security guard or person at the front desk where you live and/or work along with a photo of the abuser.
  • Give a copy of the order to anyone who is named in and protected by the order.
  • You may wish to consider changing your locks (if permitted by law) and your phone number.

Don’t forget to follow up with law enforcement (if they are serving the order) to make sure that it was served.  You can find contact information for sheriff departments on our NV Sheriff Departments page.

You may also wish to make a safety plan. People can do a number of things to increase their safety during violent incidents, when preparing to leave an abusive relationship, and when they are at home, work, and school. Many batterers obey orders of protection, but some do not and it is important to build on the things you have already been doing to keep yourself safe. Click on the following link for suggestions on Safety Tips.

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What can I do if the abuser violates the order?

You can call the police, even if you think it is a minor violation. An abuser can be arrested and charged with a violation of the order. The NV police can make an arrest with or without a warrant and regardless of whether or not the violation occurs in the officer’s presence.1

It is a good idea to write down the name of the responding officer(s) and their badge number(s) in case you want to follow up on your case.

Nevada state law requires the police to fill out a report for all domestic violence-related calls.2 Make sure a police report is filed even if no arrest is made. It can help you later if the abuser continues to violate the order for protection.

Another option is to file a violation petition in court and ask that the abuser be held in contempt of court for violating the order. If the judge finds him/her in contempt, the judge can order various penalties against the abuser.

1 N.R.S. § 33.070(1)
2 N.R.S. § 171.1227(1)

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Can a final order be extended beyond the one-year period?

No. The order cannot be extended beyond the one-year limit.1 After your current order expires, you will have to reapply for a new order for protection if a new incident of violence occurs.

1 N.R.S. § 33.080(3)

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What happens if I move?

Federal law provides what is called full faith and credit, which means that once you have an order for protection, it follows you wherever you go, including U.S. territories and tribal lands.

Different states have different rules for enforcing out-of-state orders for protection.  You can find out about your new state's policies by contacting a domestic violence program, the clerk of courts, or the prosecutor in your new area.  You might also want to call the court where you received the order to tell them your new address so that they can contact you if necessary.  However, before doing so, be sure to ask how to keep this information confidential so that the abuser couldn’t access the court file and see it.

Please see our Moving to Another State with an NV Order for Protection page for more information.

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Orders for Protection Against Sexual Assault

This is an order that provides protection from an abuser, regardless of his/her relationship to you, who has sexually assaulted you.

Basic info

What is the legal definition of sexual assault in Nevada?

Sexual assault is when someone forces sexual penetration upon you or forces you to make a sexual penetration upon him/her, another person, or an animal.  You must be unwilling to do the sexual act or the abuser must know that you are mentally or physically incapable of resisting or understanding what you are doing.1

Sexual penetration includes sexual intercourse in its ordinary meaning.  It can also include oral sex, and any insertion of any part of a person’s body or any object into the genital or anal openings of another person’s body.2

Note: If you are married to the abuser at the time of the sexual assault, it is still a sexual assault if it was committed by force or by the threat of force.3  See our Marital/Partner Rape page for general information and ways to get help.

1 N.R.S. § 200.366(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.364(2)
3 N.R.S. § 200.373

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What is an order for protection against sexual assault? What types of orders are there?

An order for protection against sexual assault is a court order that protects the victim from the abuser.  For more information on what these orders can do for you, see How can an order for protection against sexual assault help me?

There are two types of orders for protection against sexual assault in Nevada: temporary orders and extended orders.

Temporary Orders:
A temporary order for protection against sexual assault is an order that can be granted on the day you first apply for an order in court.  Whether you get this order will be based on the information you include in your petition as well as your testimony or any evidence you present when you are in front of the judge who is reviewing your petition.  You can get the order without the abuser being present in court or notified of your application for a temporary order (known as an ex parte order).1  The temporary order will last up to 30 days or until your court hearing for an extended order takes place (assuming that you file a petition for an extended order within those 30 days).2

Note: Once your temporary ex parte order is served on the abuser, s/he can file legal papers to ask the court to hold a hearing (sooner than the scheduled court hearing) at which the abuser can ask the court to change or drop the temporary order.  S/he has to give you only 2 days’ notice of this new hearing.3

Extended Orders:
An extended order will last for up to one year.4  An extended order could be granted after the abuser has been given notice of the court hearing and a hearing takes place in which you and the abuser each have an opportunity to present evidence, witnesses and testimony to prove your case.1  You may want to have a lawyer represent you at this hearing, especially if you think the abuser will have one.  For free and paid legal services, go to our NV Finding a Lawyer page.

1 N.R.S. § 200.378(3)
2 N.R.S. § 200.3782(1)
3 N.R.S. § 200.3782(2)
4 N.R.S. § 200.3782(3)

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What protections can I get in an order for protection against sexual assault?

A temporary or extended order can:

  • Direct the abuser to stay away from your home, school, business, or place of employment and any other location specifically named by the court;
  • Prohibit the abuser from contacting, intimidating, threatening, or interfering with you or any other person named in the order, including your family or household member(s); and/or
  • Include other restrictions on the abuser that the court considers necessary to protect you or any other person specifically named by the court, including members of your family or household.1

Note: If an abuser is charged with the crime of sexual assault against you, you might get a protection order from the criminal court judge with the restrictions listed above. The judge could issue this order if the abuser (defendant) is released from jail before trial or once s/he is found guilty of the crime.2 If the abuser is brought to trial, the prosecutor should inform you of the outcome of the case.3 If the court orders any restrictions on the abuser, the court clerk is supposed to provide you and any other people named in the order with a certified copy of the order.4

1 N.R.S. § 200.378(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.378(2)
3 N.R.S. § 200.3784(1)
4 N.R.S. § 200.3784(2)

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Getting the order

Who is eligible for an order for protection against sexual assault?

You may file a petition for an order for protection against sexual assault if someone has committed a sexual assault against you.1  The abuser may be someone in your family (like a husband or relative), or may be someone unrelated to you (like a neighbor or co-worker).

You must be at least 18 years old to apply for an order for protection against sexual assault.  If you are under 18 and in need of protection, you need to have an adult apply for the protection order on your behalf.2

1 See N.R.S. § 200.378(1)
2 See the information on the Clark County Courts website

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How much does it cost to get an order for protection against sexual assault?

There is no fee to file for an order for protection against sexual assault.1 Also, there is no fee to have the order served on the abuser if s/he is in the state of Nevada.2

Note: After the hearing, the court may make the abuser pay some or all of the court costs and fees.1

1 N.R.S. § 200.3781(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.3781(3)

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Do I need an attorney to get an order for protection against sexual assault?

No, you do not need a lawyer to get an order for protection against sexual assault,1 but it is often better to have one.  It may be in your interest to hire an attorney, especially if you think the abuser will be represented by one.  You may be able to find an attorney on our NV Finding a Lawyer page.

1 N.R.S. § 200.3781(2)(c)

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What are the steps to get an order for protection against sexual assault?

The steps for getting an order for protection against sexual assault will be similar to the steps for getting a order for protection against domestic violence  but you will need to fill out different forms.

If you live in Clark County, the forms and some additional information are available on the Clark County Courts website. For other counties, you can go to our NV Download Court Forms page to see if they are available online.  Otherwise, you can get the forms at the courthouse when you go to file.

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What can I do if the abuser violates the order for protection against sexual assault?

If you believe the abuser has violated the order, you can immediately call the police. If an abuser has been served with a copy of the order for protection against sexual assault and violates the order, the police can immediately arrest him/her.1

You can also file a motion (legal papers) in the court that issued the order to ask that the abuser be held in contempt of court, which basically means that you are asking that s/he be punished for violating the court order. The court will review your motion and decide whether or not there will be a hearing.2 If there is a hearing, you would present evidence about how the abuser violated the order, the abuser would present his/her defense, and the judge would decide whether the order was violated and what punishment should be given to the abuser.

1 N.R.S. § 200.3783(2)
2 See the Clark County Courts website for more information

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Orders for Protection Against Stalking & Harassment

This is an order that provides protection from an abuser, regardless of the relationship, who is stalking and/or harassing you.

Basic info

What are the legal definitions of harassment, stalking, and aggravated stalking in Nevada?

Harassment is when someone threatens you with any of the following and you reasonably fear that the threat will be carried out:

(1) To cause future physical injury to you or to another person;

(2) To cause physical damage to your property or the property of another person (besides the harasser);

(3) To physically confine or restrain (forcefully hold or keep) you or another person; or

(4) To do any act which is intended to cause significant harm to the physical or mental health or safety of you or another person.1

Stalking is when a person performs a series of acts over time that reasonably causes you to reasonably feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, harassed, or fearful for your safety, or the safety of your family or household member.2

Note: “Family or household member” means a current or former spouse, a parent, a person who is related by blood or marriage, or a person who is or was living with you.3

Aggravated stalking is when a person commits the crime of stalking (as defined above) and also threatens you with the intention of making you reasonably fear death or serious bodily harm.4

1 N.R.S. § 200.571(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.575(1)
3 N.R.S. § 200.575(6)(b)
4 N.R.S. § 200.575(2)

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What types of orders are there? How long do they last?

There are two types of orders: a temporary order and an extended order.

Temporary Orders:
A temporary order for protection against stalking and harassment is an order that can be granted on the first day you file your petition in court.  The judge will decide whether or not to give you the temporary order based on the information you include in your petition as well as your testimony or any evidence you present when you are in front of the judge who is reviewing your petition.  You can get the order without the abuser being present or notified beforehand (known as an ex parte order).1  The temporary order will last up to 30 days or until your court hearing for an extended order takes place (assuming that you file a petition for an extended order within those 30 days).2

Note: Once your temporary ex parte order is served on the abuser, s/he can file legal papers to ask the court to change or drop the temporary order sooner than the scheduled hearing.  S/he has to give you only 2 days' notice of this new hearing.3

Extended Orders:
Extended orders can only be granted after the abuser has been given notice of the court hearing and a hearing takes place in which you and the abuser each have an opportunity to present evidence and tell your different sides of the story.1  You may want to have a lawyer represent you at this hearing, especially if you think the abuser will have one.  For free and paid legal services, go to our NV Finding a Lawyer page.  An extended order lasts for up to one year.4

1 N.R.S. § 200.591(3)
2 N.R.S. § 200.594(1)
3 N.R.S. § 200.594(2)
4 N.R.S. § 200.594(3)

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What protections can I get in an order for protection against stalking and harassment?

A temporary or extended order can:

  • Tell the abuser to stay away from your home, school, business, or place of employment and any other location specifically named by the court;
  • Prohibit the abuser from contacting, intimidating, threatening, or interfering with you or any other person named in the order, including a member of your family or household; and
  • Include other restrictions on the abuser that the court considers necessary to protect you or to protect any other person specifically named by the court, including members of your family or household.1

Note: If an abuser is charged with the crime of harassment, stalking, or aggravated stalking against you, you might get a protection order from the criminal court judge with the restrictions listed above. The judge could issue this order if the abuser (defendant) is released from jail before trial or once s/he is found guilty of the crime.2 If the abuser is brought to trial, the prosecutor should inform you of the outcome of the case. If the court orders any restrictions on the abuser, the court clerk is supposed to provide you and any other people named in the order with a certified copy of the order.3

1 N.R.S. § 200.591(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.591(2)
3 N.R.S. § 200.601

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Can the abuser's gun be taken away in an order for protection against stalking and harassment?

Unlike in an order for protection against domestic violence, the law does not specifically say that a judge can prohibit the abuser from having or using a gun as part of an order for protection against stalking and harassment.1 However, if the person is convicted of stalking in criminal court and you (the victim) are his/her family or household member (as explained here), the judge can order the abuser to permanently give up his/her firearms and prohibit him/her from possessing or owning firearms. This can be known as an "admonishment of rights." If the abuser violates these terms, s/he can be guilty of a B felony and be subject to prison for between one and six years, a fine of up to $5,000, or both.2

1 See N.R.S. §§ 200.591; 33.031(1); 33.033(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.575(5)-(7)

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Getting the order

Who is eligible for an order for protection against stalking and harassment?

You may file a petition for an order for protection against stalking and harassment if someone is stalking or harassing you (according to the legal definitions of those terms).1  The abuser may be someone in your family like a husband or relative or may be someone unrelated to you like a neighbor or co-worker.

1 See N.R.S. § 200.591(1)

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The person stalking me lives in another state. Can I still file for an order in Nevada?

Possibly. Under Nevada law, harassment and stalking is considered to be committed in the place where the acts occur or in the place where the victim is located at the time s/he is harassed or stalked.1 So, for example, if you live in Nevada and the abuser lives in California, if the abuser sends you a threatening text message or email and you receive it in Nevada, the harassment can be considered to have been committed in Nevada. However, in order for a judge to issue an order against someone, the judge needs to have "personal jurisdiction" over that person. Personal jurisdiction means the judge has the power or authority over that person to make decisions that affect that person. A judge in Nevada has personal jurisdiction over anyone who lives in Nevada but if the abuser doesn't live in Nevada or doesn't have "substantial contacts" in Nevada, it's possible the judge may not have jurisdiction (power) to issue an order against that person. This is complicated and so you may want to talk to a lawyer about your specific situation for advice.

1 N.R.S. § 200.581

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How much does it cost to get an order for protection against stalking and harassment?

There is no fee to file for an order for protection against stalking and harassment.1 Also, there is no fee to have the order served on the abuser if s/he is in the state of Nevada.2

Note: After the hearing, the court may make the abuser pay some or all of the court costs and fees.1

1 N.R.S. § 200.592(1)
2 N.R.S. § 200.592(3)

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Do I need an attorney to get an order for protection against stalking and harassment?

No, you do not need a lawyer to get an order for protection against stalking and harassment,1 but it is often better to have one.  It may be in your interest to hire an attorney, especially if you think the abuser will be represented by one.  You may be able to find an attorney on our NV Finding a Lawyer page.

1 N.R.S. § 200.592(2)(c)

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What are the steps to get an order for protection against stalking and harassment?

What can I do if the abuser violates the order for protection against stalking and harassment?

If you believe the abuser has violated the order, you can immediately call the police. If an abuser has been served with a copy of the order for protection against stalking and harassment and violates the order, the police can immediately arrest him/her.1

1 N.R.S. § 200.597(2)

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Orders for Protection Against Harassment in the Workplace

This is an order obtained by an employer that provides protection from an abuser while you are in the workplace.

Basic info

What is the legal definition of harassment in the workplace?

This section defines harassment for the purpose of getting an order for protection against harassment in the workplace.

Harassment in the workplace is when a person threatens or causes:

  • Bodily injury to himself/herself or another person;
  • Damage to the property of another person; or
  • Substantial harm to the physical health, mental health or safety of a person.

The threat or act must be against an employer, an employee while performing duties of employment, or a person present at the workplace of the employer.1

Note: To qualify as harassment, the victim must reasonably fear that the harasser’s threat will be carried out and/or the harasser’s actions must reasonably cause the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated or harassed.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.240

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Who can apply for an order for protection against harassment in the workplace? (Who is an employer?)

Any employer who reasonably believes that harassment in the workplace has taken place may file an application for a temporary order for protection against harassment in the workplace.1 An employer includes both private and public employers. A public employer could be the State of Nevada, agencies of the state, and political subdivisions of the state.2

1 N.R.S. § 33.250(1)
2 N.R.S. § 33.220

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Who is considered to be an “employee” for the purposes of the order for protection?




An employee means any person who is employed by an employer. It could include someone who works part-time, full-time, or an independent contractor.1

1 See N.R.S. §§ 33.210, 33.220




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What is an order for protection against harassment in the workplace and what types of orders are there?

An order for protection against harassment in the workplace is a written court order that is designed to stop violent and harassing behavior in the workplace and to protect an employer, employees, and other people present in the workplace.

Temporary orders:
A temporary order for protection against harassment in the workplace is an order that can be issued with or without prior notice to the harasser.1 To get an order without prior notice to the harasser (known as an ex parte order), the employer’s petition has to make the judge believe that the harasser will cause immediate and irreversible damage or injury if the order isn’t issued at that time.2 If the judge does not feel that the employer proved this, then the harasser will get a chance to come to court to argue his/her side before the judge issues the temporary order.3

A temporary order lasts for up to 15 days or until a hearing is held for an extended order for protection.4 If an ex parte order is issued, the harasser can file in court for an earlier hearing to ask that the order be dropped – the harasser would only have to give the employer 2 days’ notice of this hearing.5

Extended orders:
An extended order lasts for up to one year.6 If the employer wants an extended order, s/he would file an application for an extended order during the 15 days or so that the temporary order is valid. The hearing for the extended order usually takes place within 10 days of when the employer files the application for the extended order.7

An extended order for protection against harassment in the workplace is awarded by a judge only after a hearing in which the employer and the harasser each have an opportunity to present evidence and tell their different sides of the story.

Note: A temporary order must be granted before an extended order can be requested.8

1 N.R.S. § 33.270(2),(3),(4)
2 N.R.S. § 33.270(4)(a)
3 N.R.S. § 33.270(3)
4 N.R.S. § 33.270(5)
5 N.R.S. § 33.270(9)
6 N.R.S. § 33.270(8)
7 N.R.S. § 33.270(5)-(6)
8 N.R.S. § 33.270(6)

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Does my employer have to tell me if s/he is applying for an order for protection against harassment in the workplace based on me being harassed?

Most likely, yes. If an employer knows that you, specifically, have been the target of harassment in the workplace and the employer wants to apply for an order for protection due to this harassment, the employer must try to notify you before seeking an order for protection. However, if the employer is unable to reach you before s/he goes to court, it is possible that the judge will allow him/her to get the order anyway as long as the employer can prove s/he made a “good faith effort” to notify you.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.260

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What protection can I get in an order for protection against harassment in the workplace?

Both a temporary and an extended order for protection against harassment in the workplace can:

  • prevent the harasser from contacting the employer, an employee while s/he is performing duties of employment, and any person who is present at the workplace;
  • order the harasser to stay away from the workplace; and
  • order any other relief necessary to protect the employer, the workplace, the employees while they are performing duties of employment, and any other persons who are present at the workplace.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.280(1)

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Getting an order

How much does it cost to get an order for protection against harassment in the workplace?

There is a non-refundable filing fee for an order for protection against harassment in the workplace.  The amount of the filing fee may be different in each court, so check with your local courthouse.1  (To find the contact information for the courthouse, go to NV Courthouse Locations.)

Also, when filing for a temporary order for protection against harassment in the workplace, the employer must give a security (money) to the court, in an amount determined by the court that is large enough to pay for costs and damages that the harasser might suffer, if the harasser is found “innocent.”2  The employer might get this bond money back, however, if after the court hearings, the judge does not issue a protection order or when the protection order expires on its own.  The employer would file legal papers called a “Motion for Refund of Security.”1  Also, at the end of the court hearing, the judge can make the losing party pay the attorney’s fees of the winning party.3

1 For the fee in Las Vegas Township Justice Court, go to their website
2 N.R.S. § 33.270(2)
3 N.R.S. § 33.270(10)

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What are the steps to get an order for protection against harassment in the workplace?

Do I need an attorney to get an order for protection against harassment in the workplace?

No, you do not need an attorney to file for an order of protection, but it is often better to have one.  The court also encourages you to have a lawyer for this kind of order because orders for protection against harassment in the workplace can be complex.  To find a lawyer in your area, please visit our NV Finding a Lawyer page.

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Orders for Protection of Children

This is a civil order that provides protection for your child (under 18) against an adult (18 or older), including relatives and non-relatives.

Basic info

For what crimes can I get an order for protection of children?

If you are the parent or guardian of a child (under age 18), you can file for an “order for protection of children” if you reasonably believe that an adult (18 or older) has committed a crime involving one or more of the following:

  • Physical injury to the child that did not happen by accident (non-accidental),
  • Non-accidental mental injury to the child,
  • Sexual abuse of the child, or
  • Sexual exploitation of the child.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.400(1)

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What types of orders for protection of children are there and how long do they last?

Temporary Orders:
A temporary order for protection of children is an order that can be granted based on the information you include in your petition as well as your testimony or any evidence you present when you are in front of the judge who is reviewing your petition.  You can get the order without the abuser being present in court or notified of your application for a temporary order (known as an ex parte order).2  If a judge believes that a crime has been committed, s/he can grant a temporary order.  The temporary order will last up to 30 days or until your court hearing for an extended order takes place (assuming that you file a petition for an extended order within those 30 days).3

Note: Once your temporary ex parte order is served on the abuser, s/he can file legal papers to ask the court to change or drop the temporary order sooner than the scheduled hearing.  S/he has to give you only 2 days' notice of this new hearing.4

Extended Orders:
If you did not request an extended order when you applied for a temporary order and you would like an extended order, you will need to file a petition for an extended order before your temporary order expires.3  Extended orders can only be granted after the abuser has been given notice of the hearing and a hearing takes place in which you and the abuser each have an opportunity to present evidence and tell your different sides of the story.2  You may want to have a lawyer represent you at this hearing, especially if you think the abuser will have one.  For free and paid legal services, go to our NV Finding a Lawyer page. An extended order lasts for up to one year.5

1 N.R.S. § 33.400(1)
2 N.R.S. § 33.400(4)
3 N.R.S. § 33.420(1)
4 N.R.S. § 33.420(2)
5 N.R.S. § 33.420(3)

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How can an order for protection of children help my child?

A temporary or extended order can:

  • Tell the abuser to stay away from the home, school, business, or place of employment of the child and any other location specifically named by the court;
  • Prohibit the abuser from contacting, intimidating, threatening, or otherwise interfering with the child and any other person specifically named by the court, including members of the child’s family or household; and
  • Include other restrictions on the abuser that the court considers necessary to protect the child or to protect any other person specifically named by the court, including members of the child’s family or household.1

Note: If an abuser is criminally charged with certain crimes against your minor child, and is released from jail before trial or is found guilty or guilty but mentally ill during the trial, the court may issue a temporary or extended order with the restrictions listed above or include those restrictions as conditions for the release or criminal sentence of the abuser.2 Remember, if you are not sure about what happened in the criminal case, ask the prosecutor. By law, s/he has to inform you of the result of the case if you ask.3

1 N.R.S. § 33.400(2)
2 N.R.S. § 33.400(3)
3 N.R.S. § 33.440(1)

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Getting the order for protection

Against which adults could I get an order for protection of children?

No special relationship between the child and the abuser is necessary1 as long as you believe that the person committed one of the acts described in For what crimes can I get an order for protection of children?  It may be a neighbor, a teacher, or a stranger.  It may also be a parent or relative, however you may also want to consider an order for protection against domestic violence if the abuser is related to the child.

Note: If your child has contact with an adult who committed a crime against another child, you cannot apply for an order for protection of children unless the abuser committed a crime against your child.  For example, if you know that there is a registered sex offender/ pedophile living next door, you cannot apply for an order for protection to keep him/her away from your child unless s/he harms your child.

1 N.R.S. § 33.400(1)

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My child was abused by a minor (under 18). Can I get an order for protection of children against a minor?

No.  You can only apply for an order for protection of children against someone who is 18 or older.1   Depending on the type of abuse and the relationship between your child and the abuser, you may be able to get another kind of protection order such as an order for protection against domestic violence, an order for protection against stalking and harassment, an order for protection against harassment in the workplace, or an order for protection against sexual assault.  For more information please see our NV Restraining Orders page.

1 N.R.S. § 33.400(1)

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How much will it cost to file for an order for protection of children?

There are no fees for filing for an order for protection of children.1 Also, it will not cost anything to have the order for protection of children served on the abuser if s/he is in the state of Nevada.2

Note: After the hearing, the judge may order the abuser to pay some or all of the court costs and fees.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.410(1)
2 N.R.S. § 33.410(3)

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Do I need an attorney to get an order for protection of children?

No, you do not need a lawyer to get an order for protection of children,1 but it is often better to have one.  It may be in your interest to hire an attorney, especially if you think the abuser will be represented by one.  You might be able to find an attorney on our NV Finding a Lawyer page.

1 N.R.S. § 33.410(2)(c)

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What are the steps to get an order for protection of children?

What can I do if the abuser violates the order?

If you believe the abuser has violated the order, you can immediately call the police. If an abuser has been served with a copy of the order for protection of children and violates the order, the police can immediately arrest him/her. 1

1 N.R.S. § 33.430(2)

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Moving to Another State with a Nevada Order for Protection

If you are moving to another state or are going to be out of the state for any reason, your order for protection can still be enforceable.

General rules

Can I get my order for protection from Nevada enforced in another state?

Yes. If you have a valid Nevada order for protection that meets federal standards, it can be enforced in another state. The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which is a federal law, states that all valid orders for protection granted in the United States receive "full faith and credit" in all state and tribal courts within the U.S., including U.S. territories, which means that each state must enforce out-of-state orders for protection in the same way it enforces its own orders. (See the next question to find out if your order for protection qualifies.) Therefore, if the abuser violates your out-of-state order for protection, s/he will be punished according to the laws of whatever state you are in when the order is violated.1

1 18 U.S.C. § 2265(a),(b)

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How do I know if my order for protection is good under federal law?

An order for protection is good anywhere in the United States as long as:

  • It was issued to prevent violent or threatening acts, harassing behavior, sexual violence, or it was issued to prevent another person from coming near you or contacting you.1
  • The court that issued the order had jurisdiction over the people and case.  (In other words, the court had the authority to hear the case.)
  • The abuser received notice of the order and had an opportunity to go to court to tell his/her side of the story.  It doesn’t matter if he actually showed up in court; just that he had the opportunity to do so.
    • In the case of ex parte temporary and emergency orders, the abuser must receive notice and have an opportunity to go to court to tell his/her side of the story at a hearing that is scheduled within a "reasonable time" after the order is issued.2

Note: For information on enforcing a military protective order (MPO) off the military installation, or enforcing a civil protection order (CPO) on a military installation, please see our Military Protective Orders page.

1 18 U.S.C. § 2266(5)(A)
2 18 U.S.C. § 2265(a) & (b)

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I have a temporary order for protection. Can it be enforced in another state?

Yes.  An ex parte temporary order can be enforced in other states as long as it meets the requirements listed in How do I know if my order for protection is good under federal law?1

Note: The state where you are going generally cannot extend your ex parte temporary order or issue you a permanent order when the temporary one expires.  If you need to extend your temporary order, you will have to contact the state that issued the order and arrange to be at the hearing in person or by telephone (if that is an option offered by the court).  However, you may be able to reapply for one in the new state that you are moving to if you meet the requirements for getting a protective order in that state – but, if you apply for one in a new state, the abuser would know what state you are living in, which may put you in danger.

1 18 U.S.C. § 2265(b)(2)

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Getting your order of protection enforced in another state

How do I get my order for protection enforced in another state? 

Federal law does not require you to take any special steps to get your order for protection enforced in another state.

Many states do have laws or regulations (rules) about registering or filing of out-of-state orders, which can make enforcement easier, but a valid order for protection is enforceable regardless of whether it has been registered or filed in the new state.1  Rules differ from state to state, so it may be helpful to find out what the rules are in your new state.  You can contact a local domestic violence organization for more information by visiting our Advocates and Shelters page and entering your new state in the drop-down menu.

1 18 U.S.C. § 2265(d)(2)

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Do I need a special copy of my order for protection to it enforced?

In some states, you will need a certified copy of your order for protection. A certified copy says that it is a "true and correct" copy; it is signed and initialed by the clerk of court that gave you the order, and usually has some kind of court stamp on it. In Nevada, a certified order has a stamp and a seal on it.

The copy you originally received was most likely a certified copy. If your copy is not a certified copy, call or go to the court that gave you the order and ask the clerk's office for a certified copy. There is no fee to get a certified copy of a NV order for protection.1

Note: It is a good idea to keep a copy of the order with you at all times. You will also want to bring several copies of the order with you when you move. Leave copies of the order at your work place, at your home, at the children's school or daycare, in your car, with a sympathetic neighbor, and so on. Give a copy to the security guard or person at the front desk where you live and/or work along with a photo of the abuser. Give a copy of the order to anyone who is named in and protected by the order.

1 N.R.S. § 33.050(4)

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Can I get someone to help me? Do I need a lawyer?

You do not need a lawyer to get your order for protection enforced in another state.

However, you may want to get help from a local domestic violence advocate or attorney in the state that you move to.  A domestic violence advocate can let you know what the advantages and disadvantages are for registering your order for protection, and help you through the process if you decide to do so.

To find a domestic violence advocate or an attorney in the state you are moving to please visit the Places that Help tab on the top of this page and then choose the state you want from the drop down menu on the left side of the page.

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Enforcing custody provision in another state

I was granted temporary custody with my order for protection. Can I take my kids out of the state?

Maybe.  It will depend on the exact wording of the custody provision in your order for protection.  You may have to first seek the permission of the court before leaving.  If the abuser was granted visitation rights with your children, then you may have to have the order changed, or show the court that there is a fair and realistic alternative to the current visitation schedule.

To read more about custody laws, go to our NV Custody page and NV Parental Kidnapping page.

If you are unsure about whether or not you can take your kids out of the state, it is important to talk to a domestic violence advocate or lawyer who understands domestic violence and custody laws, and can help you make the safest decision for you and your children. You can find contact information for local domestic violence organizations and legal assistance in the NV area on our NV Places that Help page.

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I was granted temporary custody with my order for protection.  Will another state enforce this custody order?

Yes. Custody, visitation, and child support provisions that are included in an order for protection can be enforced across state lines. Law enforcement and courts in another state are required by federal law to enforce these provisions.1

1 18 U.S.C. §§ 2266(5), 2265(a)

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Enforcing an Out-of-State Order in Nevada

If you are planning to move to Nevada or are going to be in Nevada for any reason, your protection or restraining order can be enforced.

General rules for out-of-state orders in Nevada

Can I get my protection order enforced in Nevada? What are the requirements?

Yes.  Your protection order can be enforced in Nevada as long as:

  • It was issued to prevent violent or threatening acts, harassing behavior, sexual violence, or it was issued to prevent another person from coming near you or contacting you.1
  • The court that issued the order had jurisdiction over the people and case. (In other words, the court had the authority to hear the case.)
  • The abuser received notice of the order and had an opportunity to go to court to tell his/her side of the story.  It doesn’t matter if he actually showed up in court; just that he had the opportunity to do so.
    • In the case of ex parte temporary and emergency orders, the abuser must receive notice and have an opportunity to go to court to tell his/her side of the story at a hearing that is scheduled within a "reasonable time" after the order is issued.2

Note: For information on enforcing a military protective order (MPO) off the military installation, or enforcing a civil protection order (CPO) on a military installation, please see our Military Protective Orders page.

1 18 U.S.C. § 2266(5)(A)
2 18 U.S.C. § 2265(a) & (b); N.R.S. § 33.085(1)

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Can I have my out-of-state protection order changed, extended, or canceled in NV?

No.  Only the state that issued your protection order can change, extend, or cancel the order.  You cannot have this done by a court in Nevada.

To have your order changed, extended, or canceled, you will have to file a motion or petition in the court where the order was issued.  You may be able to request that you attend the court hearing by telephone rather than in person, so that you do not need to return to the state where the abuser is living.  To find out more information about how to modify a restraining order, see the Restraining Orders page for the state where your order was issued.

If your order does expire while you are living in Nevada, you may be able to get a new one issued in NV but this may be difficult to do if no new incidents of abuse have occurred in NV.  To find out more information on how to get an order for protection in Nevada, visit our NV Orders for Protection Against Domestic Violence page.

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Registering your out-of-state order in Nevada

What is the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Registry? Who has access to it?

The National Crime Information Center Registry (NCIC) is a nationwide, electronic database used by law enforcement agencies in the U.S, Canada, and Puerto Rico. It is managed by the FBI and state law enforcement officials.

Before moving to Nevada, the state that issued your protection order may already have entered your order into the NCIC. If not, your order will be entered into the NCIC once your order is registered in Nevada.

All law enforcement officials have access to the NCIC database, but the information is encrypted so outsiders cannot access it.

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How do I register my protection order in Nevada?

You can register any order for protection against domestic violence issued by the court of another state, territory or Indian tribe within the United States or a Canadian domestic-violence protection order.  To register your order, you need to take a certified copy of your order to the clerk of the county or district court where you think enforcement may be necessary.  The clerk will then register your order and give you a certified copy of the registered order.1

The court will forward a copy of the order to law enforcement in your area.2  You might want to forward a copy to more than one county’s law enforcement to make enforcing the order easier if you are often in another county (such as where you work or go to school, where your children go to school, etc.).

The protection order will also be registered in the Central Repository for Nevada Records of Criminal History,3 which should be accessible by an officer anywhere in Nevada.

If you need help registering your protection order, you can contact a local domestic violence organization in Nevada for assistance.  You can find contact information for organizations in your area here on our NV Advocates and Shelters page.

1 N.R.S. §§ 33.090(1),(2)(a)-(b)
2 N.R.S. § 33.090(2)(c)
3 N.R.S. § 33.090(2)(d)

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Do I have to register my protection order in Nevada in order to get it enforced?

No. Nevada state law gives full protection to an out-of-state order for protection.1 Your order does not have to be entered into the state or federal registry in order to be enforced by a Nevada police officer, but the officer does need to believe that it is a valid (real) order.2 It may be easier for an officer to enforce your order if it contains the following information:

  • Your name;
  • The abuser’s name;
  • Something that says your order is still valid (the expiration date is for some time in the future);
  • Something that says the court that issued your order is a valid court, such as a stamp, seal, or signature that a court official placed on it.3

You might also be able get your order enforced even if you don’t have a copy of it with you. You can ask the officer to call the court that issued your order to confirm that it is real.4 It might be a good idea to keep that number on hand.

1 N.R.S. § 33.085(1)
2 N.R.S. § 33.085(5)
3 N.R.S. § 33.085(3)(a)-(c)
4 N.R.S. § 33.085(4)(c)

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Will the abuser be notified if I register my protection order?

Under the federal Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which applies to all U.S. states and territories, the court is not permitted to notify the abuser when a protective order has been registered or filed in a new state unless you specifically request that the abuser be notified.1  However, you may wish to confirm that the clerk is aware of this law before registering the order if your address is confidential.

However, remember that there may be a possibility that the abuser could somehow find out what state you have moved to.  It is important to continue to safety plan, even if you are no longer in the state where the abuser is living.  We have some safety planning tips to get you started on our Staying Safe page.  You can also contact a local domestic violence organization to get help in developing a personalized safety plan. You will find contact information for organizations in your area on our NV Advocates and Shelters page.

1 18 USC § 2265(d)

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Does it cost anything to register my protection order?

No. There is no fee for registering your protection order in Nevada.1

1 N.R.S. § 33.090(3)(a)

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What if I don't register my protection order? Will it be more difficult to have it enforced?

Maybe.  While neither federal law nor Nevada state law requires that you register your protection order in order to get it enforced, if your order is not entered into the state registry, it may be more difficult for a Nevada law enforcement official to determine whether your order is real.  Meaning, it could take longer to get your order enforced.

If you are unsure about whether registering your order is the right decision for you, you may want to contact a local domestic violence organization in your area.  An advocate there can help you decide what the safest plan of action is for you in Nevada.  To see a list of local domestic violence organizations in Nevada, go to our NV Advocates and Shelters page.

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I was granted temporary custody with my out-of-state protection order.  Will I still have temporary custody of my children in NV?

Yes.  As long as the child custody provision complies with certain federal laws,1 Nevada can enforce a temporary custody order that is a part of a protection order.

To have someone read over your order and tell you if it meets these standards, contact a lawyer in your area.  To find a lawyer in your area click here NV Finding a Lawyer.

1 The federal laws are the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Act (UCCJA) or the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), and the Parental Kidnapping Prevention Act of 1980.

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