Legal Information: North Carolina

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
December 22, 2023

Am I eligible to file for a civil no-contact order?

Any person who has suffered nonconsensual sexual acts or stalking as defined by North Carolina law can apply to the court for a civil no-contact order if these acts were committed by someone you do not have an intimate or familial relationship with.1 If you have an intimate or familial relationship with the offender, you would file for a domestic violence protection order (DVPO) instead. If the victim is “incompetent,” another competent adult who lives in North Carolina can file on behalf of the incompetent adult as long as s/he is victim of unlawful conduct that took place in North Carolina.2 You do not have to have a physical injury to get a civil no-contact order.3

In addition, an employer can file a complaint for civil no-contact order pursuant to the Workplace Violence Prevention Act. The employer could be eligible to file if an employee has suffered “unlawful conduct” from the respondent that could be interpreted to have taken place at the employee’s workplace.4

1 NCGS § 50C-1(8)
2 NCGS § 50C-2(a)(2)
3 NCGS § 50C-5(a)
4 See Complaint for civil no-contact order pursuant to the Workplace Violence Prevention Act

Can I apply for a civil no-contact order if I am a minor?

A minor can file a petition or the minor’s parent or legal guardian can file a civil no-contact order on a minor’s behalf.1

1 NCGS § 50C-2(a)(2); see also UNC School of Government

Can I file for a civil no-contact order against a minor?

A civil no-contact order can only be filed against someone who is 16 years old or older.1 However, you can still report any act of unwanted sexual conduct or stalking by someone of any age to the police.

1 NCGS § 50C-1(7)

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