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Legal Information: Alaska

Statutes: Alaska

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Updated: 
December 18, 2019

Sec. 25.20.090. Factors for consideration in awarding shared child custody

Sec. 25.20.090 Factors for consideration in awarding shared child custody.

In determining whether to award shared custody of a child the court shall consider:

(1) the child’s preference if the child is of sufficient age and capacity to form a preference;

(2) the needs of the child;

(3) the stability of the home environment likely to be offered by each parent;

(4) the education of the child;

(5) the advantages of keeping the child in the community where the child presently resides;

(6) the optimal time for the child to spend with each parent considering

(A) the actual time spent with each parent;

(B) the proximity of each parent to the other and to the school in which the child is enrolled;

(C) the feasibility of travel between the parents;

(D) special needs unique to the child that may be better met by one parent than the other;

(E) the willingness and ability of each parent to facilitate and encourage a close and continuing relationship between the other parent and the child, except that the court may not consider this willingness and ability if one parent shows that the other parent has sexually assaulted or engaged in domestic violence against the parent or a child, and that a continuing relationship with the other parent will endanger the health or safety of either the parent or the child;

(7) any findings and recommendations of a neutral mediator;

(8) any evidence of domestic violence, child abuse, or child neglect in the proposed custodial household or a history of violence between the parents;

(9) evidence that substance abuse by either parent or other members of the household directly affects the emotional or physical well-being of the child;

(10) other factors the court considers pertinent.