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Legal Information: Washington

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
December 3, 2020

What types of vulnerable adult protection orders are there? How long do they last?

There are two types of vulnerable adult protection orders: temporary orders and full orders.

Temporary orders: A temporary order is one that a judge can order ex parte when the petition is filed in court. Ex parte means that the judge can issue the order without the abuser being present or having notice of the case and if someone filed the petition on behalf of the vulnerable adult, without the vulnerable adult being present or receiving notice. To issue the temporary order without written notice to the respondent and the vulnerable adult, the petitioner (the person filing the case) must provide the judge with an affidavit (sworn written statement) that shows either that:

  • immediate and irreparable injury, loss, or damage to the vulnerable adult would occur before the parties could receive notice; or
  • the parties cannot be served with notice. You must also show your efforts to serve them and the reasons why notice should not be required.1

A temporary order can last for up to 14 days until the hearing for the full order.2

Full orders: The judge can issue a full vulnerable adult protection order after the respondent (and the vulnerable adult) receives notice and has the opportunity to appear in court for a hearing. The respondent must be served with notice at least 6 days before the hearing.3 If a third party (someone other than the vulnerable adult) starts the case, the vulnerable adult must also be served with notice at least 6 days before the hearing.4 The judge can issue a full vulnerable adult protection order for a period of up to 5 years.5

1 R.C.W. § 74.34.120(5)(b)
2 R.C.W. § 74.34.120(1)
3 R.C.W. § 74.34.120(2)
4 R.C.W. § 74.34.120(3)
5 R.C.W. § 74.34.130