WomensLaw no es solamente para mujeres. Servimos y apoyamos a todos/as los/as sobrevivientes no importa su sexo o género.

Información Legal: Federal

Violencia Doméstica en el Sistema Militar

Ver por sección

Violencia Doméstica en el Sistema Militar

Esta página incluye información sobre cómo reportar y recibir ayuda en casos de violencia doméstica en las bases militares. Por favor, si necesita ayuda visite nuestra página Servicio Militar en la página Organizaciones Nacionales.

Violencia Doméstica y el Sistema Militar

Basic info and definitions

He escuchado los términos “maltrato doméstico” y “violencia doméstica,” utilizados por personal militar. ¿Existe alguna diferencia?

Sí. En el sistema militar, “maltrato doméstico y “violencia doméstica” tienen diferentes significados.  En ambos casos, el agresor puede ser del mismo sexo o del sexo opuesto, y el él/ella debe ser uno de los siguientes:

  • su esposo actual o anterior;
  • una persona con la que usted tiene un hijo; o
  • una “pareja íntima” actual o anterior y con la que esté viviendo o haya vivido.

El maltrato doméstico se define como un patrón de comportamiento que resulta en un maltrato emocional o psicológico, control económico y/o interferencia con la libertad personal.  No necesariamente debe existir una violencia física.

La violencia doméstica
en el sistema militar es un crimen (bajo el Código de los Estados Unidos de América del Norte, el Código Uniforme de Justicia Militar o la Ley Estatal) que involucra el uso, intento de uso o amenaza de uso de la fuerza o violencia O una violación a una orden de protección.1

Si su relación con el agresor no cumple con los requerimientos, aún así puede calificar para una orden de protección civil (CPO, por sus siglas en inglés) en el estado en el que esté viviendo. Vaya a la pestaña Conozca la Ley, que se encuentra en la parte superior del lado izquierdo de está página, ingrese su estado en el menú desplegable y de click en Órdenes de Restricción para saber si califica para una CPO.

1Department of Defense Directive 6400.06, sections E2.13, E2.14

What is the military’s response to domestic violence, and how does it differ from the civilian response?

The program that helps families with domestic violence, child abuse, and child neglect within the Department of Defense (DoD) is the Family Advocacy Program (FAP). The FAP works with key military departments and civilian agencies to:

  • prevent abuse;
  • encourage early identification of abuse and prompt reporting;
  • promote victim safety and empowerment; and
  • provide advocacy and appropriate treatment and services for affected service members and their families.

One of the main differences between the military and civilian responses to domestic violence is the authority of the commanding officer when a service member commits abuse. The commanding officer can use judicial, administrative, or other punishments to respond to the reported incident. The commander consults with the Staff Judge Advocate, which is a military lawyer, to make sure the commander is following the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). Ultimately, the commander is able to determine whether to charge the service member with an offense and the appropriate punishment or discipline.

I am experiencing abuse in my relationship. How do I get help in the military system?

The Family Advocacy Program (FAP) provides clinical and non-clinical services for victims, offenders, and children impacted by domestic abuse. Services include victim advocacy, support, safety planning, offender treatment and rehabilitation, and case management services. Counseling services are available for victims who want them, upon request.

If you are a non-military victim who is being abused by a service member, you may be eligible for the full extent of the FAP services if you:

  • have a child in common with the service member;
  • live with or have lived with the service member; or
  • are or were married to the service member.

If none of these apply to you, FAP victim advocates will still provide non-military victims with basic information about how the military system works, safety planning, and offer information and referrals to help you access services offered in the civilian community.1

Every installation where families are assigned is required to have at least one victim advocate; larger installations often have several. FAP victim advocates are available to explain the range of FAP services for which you may qualify, work with you to get a military protective order, assist you with preliminary safety planning, and refer you to civilian resources, including support for getting a civil protection order (CPO) if you request one. To read more about the FAP, go to The Family Advocacy Program and Confidentiality.

1 Department of Defense website, Family Advocacy Program

Where could a victim report domestic violence within the military system?

If you are a victim of domestic violence, you may report the abuse to military law enforcement, the Family Advocacy Program (FAP), a healthcare provider, or to the victim’s or abuser’s command. However, where you first report the abuse will determine if the report is “unrestricted,” which means an official investigation will take place, or if it is “restricted,” which means that an official investigation usually does not take place.

Unrestricted reports

If you first report the abuse to law enforcement and/or command, this qualifies as an unrestricted report and will result in an official investigation of the incident. Law enforcement and command are both also required to notify the FAP of the incident for a risk assessment and safety planning.

Restricted reports

If you report the abuse to the FAP and elect a restricted report, law enforcement and command will not be notified by the FAP and there will not usually be an official investigation of the allegation; there are, however, exceptions in cases of severe risk of immediate harm to the victim or another person.

Note: If you are a victims who is a military beneficiary, you have access to medical services and FAP services with both reporting options, restricted and unrestricted. Current or former spouses and intimate partners could qualify as military beneficiaries.

You may also choose to report domestic violence outside the military system. Please see your state’s page in our Know the Laws – By State section to see how the civilian justice system handles domestic violence where you live.

What are some possible punishments that a commander can bring against a service member who commits abuse?

Some options that a commander can order against a service member who has abused his/her partner are:

  • a full investigation;
  • criminal charges;
  • imprisonment;
  • discharge from service;
  • demotion;
  • forfeiture of pay; or
  • a determination that no action is warranted.

Note: If you are a service member but the abuser is not, the commander has fewer options for holding the abuser accountable, since civilian abusers are not subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The commander could bar the abuser from the installation, however. The commander may also encourage you to seek community legal services and remedies, such as a civil protection order (CPO), and to work with the Family Advocacy Program to plan for your safety.

What options do victims have for protection orders? What are the major differences between a military protective order and a civilian protection order?

In both the military and civilian justice systems, you can seek a protection order requiring the abuser to stay away from you, your children, your home, your workplace, your school, and to not commit any violent acts against you. Civil protection orders have different names in the various states, but the military protective orders (MPOs) are consistently called that among all the Services. You can have both an MPO and a civil protection order (CPO) at the same time.

However, the procedure for getting an MPO and a CPO and how long the orders may last are quite different in both systems. There is no “due process” for issuing an MPO, which means that the abuser does not have to be served with notice, does not have the right to a hearing, and does not have the right to testify. Therefore, the order is typically short-term. A short-term MPO may be a challenge when the parties share custody of minor children. If you are concerned for the safety of your children while you seek safety from domestic violence, be sure to work with your victim advocate to address this issue. Commanders can tailor MPOs to the specific needs of victims, and they even have the authority to order the service member to not contact your children.

If you have an MPO and you live outside the military installation, it is important to know that civilian law enforcement cannot legally enforce the MPO. Civilian law enforcement may, but are not required to, contact the service member’s command to inform them of the breach of an MPO. Civilian law enforcement can only legally enforce CPOs. See our Military Protective Orders section for more information on MPOs, including enforcement of MPOs.

If I tell someone in the military that I am experiencing abuse in my relationship, will it be kept confidential?

There are just three groups of professionals who’ve been granted the authority to keep information about domestic abuse confidential under the “restricted” reporting option. They are victim advocates, Family Advocacy Program (FAP) clinicians, and medical professionals.1 However, even those three groups of professionals must report the abuse to military law enforcement and command if they believe that it is necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and immediate threat to your health or safety, or that of another person.1

You are also able to have privileged, confidential communications with a chaplain.

Making a restricted report to the FAP will still allow you to access victim advocacy services, such as safety planning, as well as medical treatment, without launching a criminal investigation or notifying command.

Reporting the incident to persons other than those mentioned above may result in a report that will not be kept confidential, which is known as an “unrestricted report.” Contacting military police or the Judge Advocate General (JAG), for example, may result in an unrestricted report. If you are concerned that your spouse/partner may learn of your seeking help for abuse, then you should first contact an FAP victim advocate, or your health care provider. They can help you consider if, when, and how to make an unrestricted report and assist you in accessing additional services.

With an unrestricted report, you or any concerned person may notify command, the FAP, or military law enforcement of an incident of abuse. Upon this report, an official command or criminal investigation of the incident will start, and you and any other victims will have access to medical and clinical services.

You may also decide to seek help outside of the military, where stricter confidentiality rules may apply. Shelters and agencies in your area can help you think through your options. To find an agency in your area, go to our Advocates and Shelters page and enter your state in the drop-down menu. Shelters near military installations are typically familiar with military and civilian policies and practices and can also help you access an FAP victim advocate if you decide to do so.

1Department of Defense Instruction, Number 6400.06, May 26, 2017, E. 3, Restricted Reporting for Incidents of Domestic Abuse

Can victims in same-sex relationships receive help?

The Department of Defense’s eligibility criteria is the same for all individuals experiencing abuse, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Help is available to all victims who are:

  • services members;
  • the current or former spouse of a service member; or
  • the current or former intimate partner of a service member and:
    • have a child in common; or
    • live(d) together.

If I am a civilian advocate who works with victims, what do I need to know?

The Department of Defense’s Family Advocacy Program provided the following information for accuracy. Inclusion of this information does not imply endorsement of WomensLaw.org by the Department of Defense.

For civilian advocates working with victims who are in the military or who are being abused by a service member, it is important to know that the DoD does not tolerate domestic violence. DoD seeks to prevent and respond to all cases of abuse through the Family Advocacy Program (FAP). A FAP is located at every military installation in the U.S. and overseas where families are assigned. However, DoD recognizes that families and individuals seeking help for abuse have the right to choose which services work best for them, including civilian programs outside of the military. DoD partners with civilian domestic violence programs and community-based advocates to protect victims, lessen the impact of abuse, and give victims a choice in their path to safety.

In the military, commanders have a broad range of authority over service members. Victims of domestic violence, whether active duty or civilian, may be reluctant to report abuse due to concerns of loss of privacy, potential repercussions to the service member’s career, and the potential impact on the family’s financial security. Additionally, when military and/or civilian authorities fail to take appropriate action following a report of domestic violence, the abuse might happen again, and it could be worse. The possibility of retaliation can keep the victim from seeking help or reporting the domestic violence incident. DoD policy provides several reporting options and services to address these concerns and encourage victims to seek help, as outlined in Where could a victim report domestic violence within the military system?

Programa Familiar de Defensa y Confidencialidad

¿Qué es el Programa de Defensa Familiar (FAP por sus siglas en inglés)?

El Departamento de Defensa (DOD, por sus siglas en inglés) estableció el Programa de Defensa Familiar (FAP por sus siglas en inglés) para encargarse de la violencia familiar entre las familias de militares. El FAP está diseñado para prevenir, identificar, reportar y tratar todos los aspectos de maltrato de menores y negligencia, así como violencia o abuso doméstica, a través de esfuerzos de alcance, prevención e intervención. El personal del FAP debe trabajar estrechamente y en colaboración con comandos militares, autoridades militares, personal médico, personal del centro familiar y capellanes, así como con organizaciones y agencias civiles, para prevenir la violencia familiar y ayudar a las familias de las tropas a desarrollar relaciones más sanas.1

1Department of Defense website, Family Advocacy Program

¿Qué sucede una vez que el FAP recibe un reporte de abuso?

Una vez que el FAP recibe un reporte de abuso de usted o de quien quiera que usted haya reportado, se requiere una acción inmediata. El FAP le asignará un consejero para comenzar la investigación y ofrecerle servicios inmediatos. El consejero del FAP hablará por separado con usted y con el agresor, para obtener más información de lo sucedido y así poder desarrollar una recomendación de servicios o tratamiento para poner fin al abuso.1

La información recabada durante la investigación será presentada ante el Comité de Revisión de Casos (“Case Review Committee” o CRC, por sus siglas en inglés), quien determinará si en efecto ha ocurrido abuso o violencia doméstica. El CRC utiliza el lenguaje “substanciado” cuando consideran que ha ocurrido abuso/violencia y “no substanciado” cuando no consideran que haya ocurrido. El CRC cuenta con trabajadores sociales, defensores para la víctima, consejeros, capellanes, personal médico y legal, así como un representante del comando. En algunas instalaciones, también se solicita la asistencia a la revisión, del supervisor inmediato del presunto agresor.2

El CRC considerará si el agresor pudiera ser un buen candidato para obtener ayuda para el maltrato y un tratamiento, posiblemente también un tratamiento para alcohólicos u otros servicios individuales específicos. Ellos recomendarán al comando quien es el que toma la última decisión si el agresor debe ser sometido a ayuda y tratamiento, o si en lugar, sería apropiada una corte marcial y la separación del Servicio.1

1 See Department of Defense website, Family Advocacy Program
2See Department of Defense website, Glossary and Domestic Abuse, Frequently Asked Questions

¿Qué le pasará a mi esposo/a si reporto su abuso?

Si usted levanta un reporte no confidencial (sin restricción) de abuso o violencia doméstico, cometido por un miembro del ejército quien es o era su esposo o pareja íntima, el FAP (el “Family Advocacy Program”) se verá involucrado.  El FAP puede recomendar tratamiento para el agresor u otros servicios, a través del CRC (el “Case Review Committee”).  Para leer más sobre el FAP y CRC, vea ¿Qué pasa después de que el FAP recibe un reporte de abuso?

El comandante del agresor tendrá la autoridad total para decidir qué hacer con el reporte de abuso.  El castigo puede consistir desde documentar el comportamiento en el expediente de servicio de miembros (“record book”), hasta ordenar tratamiento clínico y/o tomar acción disciplinaria o castigarlo(a) si lo cree apropiado.1

En la mayoría de los casos, si no hay ningún reporte previo de violencia o maltrato doméstico en el FAP y la naturaleza del abuso/violencia no es una amenaza a su vida, la mayoría de los comandantes ordenarán al agresor que cumpla con las recomendaciones de tratamiento del FAP.  Si hay muchos reportes previos, si el agresor ya estuvo en tratamiento, o si la naturaleza de la violencia es severa, el comandante puede comenzar un caso criminal, separar administrativamente a su esposo(a) del ejército militar o comenzar procedimientos para el juicio marcial (“court martial”).

1 Vea “The Military Response to Victims of Domestic Violence, Tools for Civilian Advocates,” publicada por el Battered Women’s Justice Project

Retiro de Armas de Fuego

¿El ejército militar retirará las armas de fuego del agresor?

Si el agresor es miembro del ejército o es un empleado civil del ejército, y tiene:

  • un delito menor o una condena por delito mayor por un crimen de violencia doméstica en una corte civil, o
  • una condena por un crimen de violencia doméstica en una corte marcial general o especial,

el ejército entonces puede:

  • retirar cualquier arma de fuego y municiones militares, y
  • suspender la autoridad del individuo para poseer armas de fuego y municiones militares.1

El ejército militar no retirará las armas de fuego por:

  • condenas inmediatas de corte marcial,
  • castigo no judicial,
  • enjuiciamiento diferido en cortes civiles, o
  • determinación como “substanciada” de abuso por el FAP del Comité de Revisión de Casos.1

Ya que las MPO se emiten administrativamente por el comandante, se les considera “no judiciales.” Así que si usted cuenta con una MPO, el ejército militar no podrá retirar las armas de fuego del agresor, a menos que tenga también una condena por violencia doméstica.1

Nota: También es importante mencionar que no siempre se da cumplimiento al retiro de armas.

1 Vea Family Advocacy Program Commander’s Guide, páginas 39 hasta 45

Cómo Obtener Más Ayuda

Si me separo del agresor, ¿obtendré alguna ayuda económica?

Sí. Usted puede calificar para el Programa Temporal de Indemnización (“Transitional Compensation Program”), que otorga privilegios financieros, médicos, dentales, de despensa e intercambio (de otros bienes/productos) a miembros de la familia que han sido víctimas de abuso por parte de algún miembro del ejército.

Si usted se ha separado del agresor, entonces usted es elegible para la indemnización temporal, si:

  • el miembro del ejército ha servido activamente por al menos 30 días;
  • usted estuvo casado con un miembro del ejército o es usted familiar de éste, y estuvo viviendo con él/ella en su casa cuando ocurrió la ofensa; y
  • se cumple con una de las siguientes condiciones:
    • el miembro del ejército ha sido separado administrativamente de su cargo por algún abuso cometido en contra de algún miembro de la familia; O
    • fue condenado por una corte marcial por ofensa de abuso Y ya sea que esté separado de su cargo después de la condena O sentenciado a confiscación de todo pago y provisiones.1

Los pagos se realizan una vez al mes durante 12 a 36 meses y comenzarán ya sea:

  • en la fecha en que comienza la separación administrativa; o
  • en la fecha en que se da la sentencia de la corte marcial o cuando el acuerdo del juicio previo es aprobado.2

Usted ya no será elegible para recibir los beneficios si usted se vuelve a casar, regresa a vivir con el agresor, si la condena se reduce a un castigo menor o si se revoca (cancela) la separación administrativa.2

Si el comandante considera la separación de su esposo del ejército, es mejor que acuda con su consejero del FAP, para asegurarse que el comandante prepare la documentación apropiada para usted y que pueda recibir estos beneficios. También puede informarse con el FAP cual será la cantidad de indemnización mensual que se le otorgará tanto a usted como a sus hijos.

Nota: Aunque usted no califique para el Programa Temporal de Indemnización, el reglamento del ejército exige que los miembros del servicio proporcionen “el apoyo adecuado” a los miembros de la familia.2 Comuníquese al departamento jurídico de la base para más información.

1 Vea DoD Instruction 1342.24, Transitional Compensation for Abused Dependents
2The Military Response to Victims of Domestic Violence, Tools for Civilian Advocates,” publicada por el Battered Women’s Justice Project

Si nos encontramos establecidos en el extranjero, ¿en dónde puedo encontrar ayuda?

Las víctimas de violencia doméstica se pueden volver muy vulnerables cuando se encuentran en el extranjero, ya que es más probable que no hayan muchos servicios disponibles, tanto en la base, como fuera de ella.  Sin embargo, un agresor puede ser aún castigado por cometer algún acto de violencia doméstica en contra de usted.  Si el agresor es un civil (tal como empleados del gobierno, contratista civil o miembros de la familia de un miembro del ejército) y comete un delito grave de violencia doméstica, él/ella puede ser enjuiciado en una corte federal en los EEUU si es que la nación de hospedaje declina el enjuiciamiento.  Si el agresor es un miembro del ejército, puede ser enjuiciado bajo el Código Uniforme de Justicia Militar aún cuando la nación de hospedaje decline el enjuiciamiento.1

Si usted es un miembro civil de la familia, y el miembro de servicio se trasladó en el extranjero, el ejército militar no le exige a usted que se mude al extranjero con el miembro del ejército.  (De hecho, las familias con un historial de violencia doméstica pueden ser eliminadas para la reubicación en el extranjero debido a la mayor vulnerabilidad y reducción del acceso a los servicios.)  Sin embargo, si usted reubica, puede solicitar una “reubicación por seguridad personal” aún estando en el extranjero si es víctima de abuso y su seguridad está en riesgo.   El ejército militar le puede permitir llevarse un vehículo con usted, que esté a su nombre o a nombre del miembro del ejército, cuando se reubica.1

Para ponerse en contacto con alguien que le pueda ofrecer ayuda, puede hacerlo a la Línea Americana de Crisis por Violencia Doméstica (Amercian Domestic Violence Crisis Line), al correo electrónico //crisisat866uswomen.org">crisisat866uswomen.org o puede hacer una llamada internacional sin costo llamando al operador de AT&T desde el país en donde esté viviendo y solicitar lo conecten al 866-USWOMEN.  La línea de crisis se encuentra también disponible en los EEUU para ayudar a familias que tienen algún ser querido que es víctima de abuso en el extranjero – llame al 1-866-USWOMEN (sin costo).  La misión de la Línea Americana de Crisis por Violencia Doméstica (American Domestic Violence Crisis Line) es servir a los americanos víctimas de abuso en países extranjeros.  Para mayor información, favor de visitar la página de internet www.866uswomen.org.

1“The Military Response to Victims of Domestic Violence, Tools for Civilian Advocates,” página 51, publicada por the Battered Women’s Justice Project

¿Dónde puedo encontrar recursos adicionales en Internet?

Hay información adicional en Internet. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los sitios de Internet son en inglés. Instrucciones de cómo traducir sitios de la red . Si quiere información adicional y no lee inglés, contáctanos.

Para ayuda, puede contactar a:

The Miles Foundation, Inc. (La Fundación Miles, Inc.)
Email: Milesfdnataol.comSoporte para personal militar, civil, ex-cónyuges, compañeros íntimos, y niños, provee servicios a víctimas de violencia perpetrados por/a personal militar.

Military Family Resource Center (Centro de Recursos para las Familias del servicio Militar)
Tel : 703-696-9053
E-mail: mfrcathq.odedodea.eduWebsite: http://apps.militaryonesource.mil/MOS/f?p=OC_PORTAL
El Centro de Recursos para las Familias del servicio Militar (MFRC) provee información acerca de las regulaciones y programas para las familias del servicio militar del Departamento de Defensa.

The Minerva Center (El Centro Minerva)
Tel: 410-437-5379
Web site: www.minervacenter.com
Fundación educacional que realiza estudios de mujeres militares y mujeres participantes en guerras. El centro Minerva también provee soporte a través de Internet a grupos y a un listserve.

National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence (Centro Nacional de Violencia Doméstica y Violencia Sexual)
Tel: 512-407-9020
Contactos Militares: www.ncdsv.org/ncd_contacts.html
Publicaciones Militares: www.ncdsv.org/ncd_militaryresponse.html

National Military Family Association (Asociación Nacional de Familas Militares)
Tel: 703-823-NMFA
Web site: www.militaryfamily.org
La Asociación Nacional de Familias Militares (NMFA) fue creada por esposas y viudas del personal militar que estaban buscando seguridad financiera. Los programas del NMFA educan a familias militares, el público, y el Congreso acerca de los derechos y beneficios de las familias militares.

National Organization for Victim Assistance (Organización Nacional para Asistencia a Víctimas)
Tel: 202-232-6682
Web site: www.try-nova.org
La Organización Nacional para Asistencia a Víctimas (NOVA) provee asistencia a víctimas y testigos por parte de profesionales de salud mental, justicia criminal, defensores, investigadores, víctimas y sobrevivientes y otros profesionales del rubro.

Center for Women Veterans (Centro para Mujeres Veteranas)
Tel: 202-273-6193
Website: www1.va.gov/womenvet/
Departamento para asuntos de veteranos. 

Por favor vaya a nuestra página de organizaciones nacionales y haga clic en Servicio Militar para ver más recursos útiles. Listamos organizaciones que usted puede llamar para recibir ayuda, tal cómo la Línea de Ayuda de Seguridad del Departamento de Defensa (DoD en inglés), teléfono: (877) 995-5247, la cual provee consejo individualizado, apoyo e información para la comunidad mundial del Departamento de Defensa. Este servicio es anónimo, seguro, y disponible 24 horas al día, 7 días a la semana, proveyendo víctimas con la ayuda que necesitan, a cualquier momento, en cualquier lugar.

Puede encontrar un articulo relevante aquí:
Un Servicio Considerable: Introducción de un Defensor a Violencia Doméstica y el Militar por Christine Hansen, Reporte de Violencia Doméstica, publicado por el Civic Research Institute (2001) 

Puede encontrar un ejemplo de una MPO aquí:
Orden de Protección Militar del Departamento de Defensa, DD Formulario 2873, APR 2004.

 

 

Órdenes de Protección Militares

Esta página incluye Información sobre las órdenes de protección militares y cómo se protegen a las víctimas en las instalaciones militar. Para ayuda, por favor visite la página Información Militar en la sección de Organizaciones Nacionales.

Información Básica sobre Órdenes de Protección Militares (MPOs)

¿Qué es una Órden de Protección Militar (MPO)?

Los comandantes de la unidad pueden emitir Órdenes de Protección Militar (MPO) a algún miembro activo del ejército para proteger a una víctima de abuso/violencia domésticos o maltrato de menores (la víctima puede ser un miembro del ejército o un civil). Para calificar, el agresor tiene que ser su esposo(a)/ex-esposo(a), o su pareja íntima actual o anterior, o tener un hijo con el agresor. Una víctima, un abogado para la víctima, una agencia de aplicación de la ley en la base, o un médico del FAP, pueden solicitar al comandante que emita una MPO.1

Las MPOs pueden ordenar al agresor (conocido como “el sujeto”), que:

  • no tenga contacto o comunicación, ya sea cara a cara, vía telefónica, escrita o por una tercera persona, con usted o algún miembro de su familia o alguien de su casa;
  • mantenerse alejado de la casa familiar ya sea dentro o fuera de la base;
  • mantenerse alejado de la escuela de los niños, centros de desarrollo de los niños, programas para jóvenes y su lugar de trabajo;
  • mudarse a dormitorios para soldados (barraca militar)
  • retirarse de cualquier lugar público cuando la víctima se encuentre en el mismo lugar o base;
  • hacer o dejar de hacer ciertas actividades;
  • acudir a consejo; y
  • hacer entrega de la credencial de custodia de sus armas militares.1

Los comandantes pueden ajustar la orden para cumplir con sus necesidades específicas.1

Una MPO es únicamente aplicable mientras el miembro del ejército pertenezca al comando que emitió la orden. Cuando el miembro del ejército es transferido a un nuevo comando, la orden ya no es válida. Si la víctima aún cree que la MPO es necesaria para manterse a salvo, la víctima, un abogado para la víctima, algún personal del FAP pueden solicitar al comandante que emitió la MPO que contacte al nuevo comandante para ponerle al tanto de la MPO y solicitarle una nueva.2 El comandante que emitió la MPO debe recomendar al nuevo comando que se emita una nueva MPO cuando el miembro del ejército es transferido a un nuevo comando y una MPO es aún necesaria para proteger a la víctima.3

Los agresores civiles no pueden estar sujetos a una MPO. Ellos sólo pueden estar sujetos a una orden de protección civil emitida por un estado o una corte tribal. Sin embargo, un comandante puede ordenar al agresor civil que se mantenga alejado de la base.1

Asegúrese de obtener una MPO por escrito del comandante para que la pueda tener con usted en todo momento

1 “Respuesta Militar a Víctimas de Violencia Doméstica, Herramientas para el Abogado Civil” publicada por the Battered Women’s Justice Project, www.bwjp.org
2 Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Incorporando el Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011
3 Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Incorporando el Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011, sección 6.1.2.7

¿Califico para obtener una Órden de Protección Militar MPO?

Usted es elegible para presentar una MPO en contra de un miembro activo del ejército, quien haya abusado de usted o de sus hijos y quien es su esposo(a)/ex-esposo(a), pareja íntima con la que esté o haya vivido o alguna persona con la que tenga un hijo.  Si el comandante está de acuerdo, se ordenará una MPO.1

1 Vea Military OneSource

What protections can I get in a military protective order (MPO)?

The MPO can say that the service member has to do certain things and can also prohibit certain behaviors. MPOs may order the abuser (referred to as “the subject”) to:

  • have no contact or communication with you or members of the your family or household, including:
  • face-to-face;
  • by telephone;
  • in writing;
  • by email;
  • through social media; or
  • through a third party;
  • stay away from the family home, whether it is on or off the installation;
  • stay away from your children’s schools, child development centers, youth programs, and your place of employment;
  • move into government quarters (barracks);
  • leave any public place if you are in the same location or facility;
  • do certain activities or stop doing certain activities;
  • attend counseling; and
  • surrender his/her government-issued weapons.1

Commanders may tailor the order to meet your specific needs so be sure to let the commander know what would best protect you.1

Civilian abusers are not subject to MPOs. They may only be subject to a civil protection order (CPO) issued by a state or tribal court. However, a commanding officer can bar the civilian abuser from the installation, which could help to protect you if you live on the installation.1

Make sure that you get a copy of the MPO from the commanding officer so that you are aware of restrictions placed on the service member. It is important you have it with you at all times.

1 See Department of Defense Instruction, Number 6400.06, Incorporating Change 4, May 26, 2017

¿Por cuánto tiempo es válida una MPO?

Por lo regular, las MPOs son de corto plazo y pueden durar hasta 10 días.1 Por lo regular, son emitidas por el tiempo que le tome al FAP investigar su demanda, así como proporcionar al comandante información adicional. El abogado para la víctima en su base sabrá cuanto tiempo le toma generalmente al CRC proporcionarle al comandante los resultados de su investigación, así que es recomendable que le pida al comandante que tome en cuenta ese cuadro de tiempo cuando se emita una MPO.

Su MPO puede o no tener una fecha de expiración. Sin embargo, aún cuando tenga o no una fecha de expiración, el comandante puede revisar la MPO en cualquier momento para modificarla o disolverla (terminarla). 1

Así mismo, una MPO sólo es aplicable mientras el miembro del ejército pertenezca al comando que emitió la orden. Cuando el miembro del ejército es transferido a un nuevo comando, la orden ya no es válida. Si usted aún necesita la protección de una MPO, el comandante que la emitió debe contactar al nuevo comandante para informarle sobre la MPO y recomendarle la emisión de una nueva.2

1 “The Military Response to Victims of Domestic Violence, Tools for Civilian Advocates,” published by the Battered Women’s Justice Project, www.bwjp.org
2Department of Defense Instruction, Number 6400.06, Incorporando Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011, section 6.1.2.7

¿Cómo obtengo y cómo hago aplicable una Orden de Protección Militar (MPO)?

¿Pueden las víctimas en relaciones del mismo sexo recibir ayuda?

Sí.  La política del Programa de Defensa Familiar (“Family Advocacy Program” o “FAP,” por sus siglas en inglés) se ha cambiado de la de años anteriores para incluir a personas en relaciones del mismo sexo.1

Las víctimas en las relaciones entre personas del mismo sexo (y las relaciones heterosexuales) que son civiles y no se casan con el miembro en servicio activo son elegibles para los servicios limitados de FAP (evaluación de riesgos y peligros, planificación de seguridad, etc.), pero el FAP les referiría a recursos en la comunidad para los servicios en curso.  Ellos no son elegibles para los servicios médicos, ya que no son beneficiarios del sistema de salud militar.

Las víctimas en situaciones de violencia doméstica entre personas del mismo sexo también pueden solicitar y recibir una orden de protección militar.  Consulte nuestra página Órdenes de Protección Militar para más información.

1 See DoD Instruction 6400.06 (Incorporating Change 1, September 20, 2011)

En la página de Víctimas LGBTQIA, puede encontrar información sobre el maltrato a víctimas de la comunidad LGBTQIA y los tipos de barreras que pueden enfrentar.

¿Cómo será el proceso para obtener una MPO? ¿Tendré que estar en la misma sala en la que esté el agresor?

A diferencia de una corte civil, no existe un juicio o una audiencia. Usted no tendrá que comparecer frente a un juez Usted no tendrá que atestiguar frente al agresor o estar en la misma sala en la que él se encuentre.

El comandante es el que decide si se emite o no una MPO. El comandante puede, o no, reunirse con usted antes de emitir la MPO. Algunas veces, el abogado para la víctima en el FAP puede llamar al comandante a nombre de usted y solicitar la MPO. Si el comandante quiere reunirse con usted antes de otorgarle la MPO, usted puede ir a su oficina o reunirse con el en el FAP o recinto local. Si el comandante cree de manera razonable, que para su protección, es necesaria una MPO, entonces será emitida.

¿Cuánto cuesta obtener una MPO?

No cuesta nada obtener una Orden de Protección Militar (MPO).

¿Qué puedo hacer si no se me otorga una MPO?

Es muy probable que el comandante emita una MPO si así lo recomienda el FAP como parte de su revisión del caso. Sin embargo, si no se le otorga una MPO, aún así puede ser elegible para una orden de protección civil o una orden restrictiva emitida en el estado en el que resida. A diferencia de los procedimientos de una orden de protección civil, no existe un proceso real de apelación en el sistema militar si se le niega una MPO o si usted no está de acuerdo con la decisión del comandante. Si se le niega una MPO, usted puede buscar ayuda de diferentes maneras, y puede continuar informando al comandante si hay más abuso, pero no puede “apelar” la decisión.

En la parte superior de este sitio, visite la página Órdenes de Restricción para su estado, para saber si usted puede ser elegible para una orden de restricción civil.

Favor de tomar en cuenta que a pesar de que existe una ley que exige a las bases militares la aplicación de órdenes de protección y órdenes de restricción civiles, esta ley puede no ser aplicada en su totalidad. Vea ¿Las MPOs y las Órdenes de Protección Civil (CPO, por sus siglas en inglés), son válidas a donde quiera que vaya?

¿Qué debo hacer si el agresor viola la MPO? ¿Cómo se castigará al agresor?

Si el agresor viola su MPO, usted puede llamar a la policía militar (Oficina de autoridades de la base.) Si usted se encuentra fuera de la base, puede llamar al 911 y solicitar que lo contacten con las autoridades de la base.1 También es aconsejable que llame al abogado para la víctima y/o a su consejero del FAP, si es que cuenta con uno.

La violación a una MPO es lo mismo que desobedecer una orden directa, lo cual es una ofensa seria en el ámbito militar.2 El agresor puede ser enjuiciado bajo el Código Uniforme de Justicia Militar - bajo el Artículo 90, Agresión o Desacato Deliberado al Oficial Comisionado Superior o Artículo 92, Incumplimiento a la Orden o Reglamento.3

Dependiendo de ciertos factores, una violación a la MPO puede resultar en un castigo no judicial, procedimientos en una corte marcial u otras medidas disciplinarias.

Nota:
Recuerde que si el agresor viola una CPO, usted puede llamar al 911 y el agresor puede ser arrestado por la policía civil y enjuiciado por las cortes. Así mismo, si la policía civil notifica a las autoridades de la base sobre una violación a una CPO fuera de base, por parte de un miembro del ejército, las autoridades de la base deben notificar a su vez al comandante del agresor.1

1Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Agosto 21, 2007, sección E4
2 “Respuesta Militar a Víctimas de Violencia Doméstica, Herramientas para el Abogado Civil,” publicado por the Battered Women’s Justice Project, www.bwjp.org
3Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Agosto 21, 2007, sección 6.1.2.6

Órdenes de Protección Militares y Órdenes de Protección Civil

What are the major differences between a military protective order and a civilian protection order?

In both the military and civilian justice systems, you can seek a protection order requiring the abuser to stay away from you, your children, your home, your workplace, your school, and to not commit any violent acts against you. Civil protection orders have different names in the various states, but the military protective orders (MPOs) are consistently called that among all the Services. You can have both an MPO and a civil protection order (CPO) at the same time.

However, the procedure for getting an MPO and a CPO and how long the orders may last are quite different in both systems. There is no “due process” for issuing an MPO, which means that the abuser does not have to be served with notice, does not have the right to a hearing, and does not have the right to testify. Therefore, the order is typically short-term. A short-term MPO may be a challenge when the parties share custody of minor children. If you are concerned for the safety of your children while you seek safety from domestic violence, be sure to work with your victim advocate to address this issue. Commanders can tailor MPOs to the specific needs of victims, and they even have the authority to order the service member to not contact your children.

¿Las MPOs y las Órdenes de Protección Civil (CPO, por sus siglas en inglés), son válidas a donde quiera que vaya?

La respuesta varía de acuerdo al tipo de orden. Una MPO no será aplicable directamente fuera de la base por una corte civil o por la policía. Sin embargo, la policía local por lo regular tiene un acuerdo con la base para detener a alguien quien probablemente haya cometido una violación hasta que la policía militar pueda responder. A este acuerdo se le llama “memorando de entendimiento” o “MOU, por sus siglas en inglés” Sin importar si hay una respuesta al momento del incidente, puede ser aún una violación a la orden de un comando violar la MPO fuera de la base y el comandante puede, aunque no es obligatorio, disciplinar al miembro del ejército por cualquier violación.1

De acuerdo con las reglas militares, los miembros deben seguir una CPO aún cuando se encuentren en la base. Los Comandantes y las autoridades deben tomar todas las medidas necesarias para asegurar que se aplique toda la fuerza y efecto a una CPO en todas las instalaciones que se encuentren dentro de la jurisdicción de la corte que emitió dicha orden. Los miembros activos que no respetan una CPO pueden ser sujetos a una acción disciplinaria o administrativa, bajo el Código Uniforme de Justicia Militar.2 El juez de la corte civil que emitió la CPO puede castigar al agresor por violación a la CPO, aún cuando haya ocurrido en base. Así mismo, a los civiles que violen una CPO, incluyendo empleados civiles del Departamento de Defensa, se les puede negar el acceso a la base.3

1Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Incorporando el Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011, section 6.1.2.6
2 Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Incorporando el Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011, sections 6.2.1.3; 6.1.3.3.1
3 Departamento de Defensa Instrucción, Número 6400.06, Incorporando el Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011, sections 6.1.3.4; 6.1.3.3.2

¿Necesito tanto una MPO, como una orden de protección civil?


Sería una buena idea tratar de conseguir ambas órdenes (MPO y CPO), para poder tener una protección total. Si usted ya cuenta con una CPO, también puede solicitar una MPO. Los términos de una MPO no pueden contradecir a los de una CPO. Una MPO pudiera contener más restricciones para el agresor que una CPO y pudiera aplicar al miembro del ejército aún cuando se encuentre en el extranjero (a diferencia de una CPO).1

La mayoría de las familias militares salen de la base frecuentemente, para ir de compras, a la escuela, al trabajo, visitar amigos o a ir a restaurantes y algunas pueden de hecho vivir fuera de la base. Dada la limitación de la aplicación de una MPO fuera de la base, lo mejor sería considerar la ayuda de una orden de protección civil así como la MPO. Aunque en varias comunidades, se requiere que la policía civil detenga a un miembro del ejército que ha violado una MPO hasta que se le pueda turnar a la policía militar, las autoridades locales civiles pueden no estar al tanto de que tienen la autoridad de actuar cuando se viola una MPO. Por lo tanto, frecuentemente se recomienda una orden de protección civil.

Tanto el abogado para la víctima en el FAP, como la agencia civil local para la violencia doméstica pueden ser un recurso para explicar el proceso de obtención de una CPO en su área. Usted también puede platicar con un abogado fuera de la base para ver si es elegible para una CPO y/o buscar ser representada en la corte de audiencia. Vaya a

Encontrando a un Abogado
y seleccione su estado en el menú desplegable.

Nota: Los procedimientos de una MPO pueden no ser confidenciales, esto depende de la base militar en la que usted se encuentre. Si usted está preocupado por su privacidad o seguridad, es mejor que consulte una agencia local para la violencia doméstica para expresar sus opiniones al buscar una orden de protección militar o civil.

1Department of Defense Instruction, Number 6400.06, Incorporando Cambio 1, el 20 de septiembre del 2011,sections 6.1.2.5.3; 6.1.2.5.1