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Legal Information: Illinois

Statutes: Illinois

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Updated: 
June 26, 2020

5/12-3.8. Violation of a civil no contact order

(a) A person commits violation of a civil no contact order if:

(1) he or she knowingly commits an act which was prohibited by a court or fails to commit an act which was ordered in violation of:

(A) a remedy of a valid civil no contact order authorized under Section 213 of the Civil No Contact Order Act or Section 112A-14.5 of the Code of Criminal Procedure of 1963; or

(B) a remedy, which is substantially similar to the remedies authorized under Section 213 of the Civil No Contact Order Act or Section 112A-14.5 of the Code of Criminal Procedure of 1963, or in a valid civil no contact order, which is authorized under the laws of another state, tribe, or United States territory; and

(2) the violation occurs after the offender has been served notice of the contents of the order under the Civil No Contact Order Act, Article 112A of the Code of Criminal Procedure of 1963, or any substantially similar statute of another state, tribe, or United States territory, or otherwise has acquired actual knowledge of the contents of the order.

A civil no contact order issued by a state, tribal, or territorial court shall be deemed valid if the issuing court had jurisdiction over the parties and matter under the law of the state, tribe, or territory. There shall be a presumption of validity when an order is certified and appears authentic on its face.

(a-3) For purposes of this Section, a “civil no contact order” may have been issued in a criminal or civil proceeding.

(a-5) Failure to provide reasonable notice and opportunity to be heard shall be an affirmative defense to any charge or process filed seeking enforcement of a foreign civil no contact order.

(b) Prosecution for a violation of a civil no contact order shall not bar a concurrent prosecution for any other crime, including any crime that may have been committed at the time of the violation of the civil no contact order.

(c) Nothing in this Section shall be construed to diminish the inherent authority of the courts to enforce their lawful orders through civil or criminal contempt proceedings.

(d) A defendant who directed the actions of a third party to violate this Section, under the principles of accountability set forth in Article 5 of this Code, is guilty of violating this Section as if the same had been personally done by the defendant, without regard to the mental state of the third party acting at the direction of the defendant.

(e) Sentence. A violation of a civil no contact order is a Class A misdemeanor for a first violation, and a Class 4 felony for a second or subsequent violation.