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Información Legal: Vermont

Restraining Orders

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Actualizada: 
13 de diciembre de 2019

What happens if the abuser violates the order?

You can call the police even if you think it is a minor violation. Intentionally violating a sexual assault or stalking protective order can be put in jail for up to one year, fined up to $5,000, or both. The penalties increase can increase to up to three years in prison and up to $25,000 in fines (or both) if s/he has a prior conviction for violating a sexual assault or stalking protective order, a relief from abuse order, or an order preventing contact with a child or if s/he a prior conviction for domestic assault or aggravated domestic assault.1

Make sure a police report is filled out, even if no arrest is made. If you have legal documentation of all violations of the order, it may help you have the order extended or modified in the future. It is a good idea to write down the name of the responding officer(s) and their badge numbers in case you want to follow up on your case.

You also have the option for filing for contempt in the court where your order was issued.

1 VT ST T. 13 § 1030(a),(b)

Can the order be changed or extended?

Yes. When your order expires, you can file a motion with the court to extend your order. The judge can extend it for such additional time as the judge believes is necessary to protect you and/or your children. There does not have to be another incident of stalking or sexual assault during the time you had the order to extend it.1

To change an order, you or the abuser can file a motion to modify (change) the order if there has been a substantial change in circumstance. The judge can change the order at any time.1

1 VT ST T. 12 § 5133(e)