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Important: Even if courts are closed, you can still file for a protection order and other emergency relief. See our FAQ on Courts and COVID-19.

Legal Information: Illinois

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
June 26, 2020

Who is eligible for an order of protection?

The following people can be eligible for an order of protection:

  1. a person abused by a family or household member;
  2. a high-risk adult with disabilities who is abused, neglected, or exploited by a family or household member;
  3. a minor child or dependent adult in the care of the abused person or high-risk adult mentioned above;
  4. a person living or employed at a private home or public shelter that houses an abused family or household member; and
  5. any of the following people if they are abused by the family or household member of a child:
    • a foster parent of that child;
    • a legally-appointed guardian or legally-appointed custodian of that child;
    • an adoptive parent of that child; or
    • a prospective adoptive parent of that child.1

As mentioned in #3 above, you can file for an order of protection for yourself and/or your minor child(ren). A minor may also be able to file on his/her own. See Can a minor file for an order of protection? for more information.

Note: When it comes to filing the actual petition in court, anyone can file on behalf of:

  • a minor child or an adult who has been abused by a family or household member who cannot file a petition because of age, health, disability or inaccessibility; or
  • a high-risk adult with disabilities who has been abused, neglected, or exploited by a family or household member.2

1 750 ILCS 60/201(a)
2 750 ILCS 60/201(b)