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Legal Information: Colorado

State Gun Laws

Updated: 
November 8, 2018

If the abuser's gun is taken away, what will happen to it?

If there is a provision in your protection order that says that the abuser has to surrender his/her guns, the guns could be kept by the sheriff department in his/her county, or in some cases, law enforcement will allow the abuser to leave the guns with a friend or relative while the protection order is in effect. If the abuser’s gun is taken by the police because it was used in a crime, it will be sold or destroyed.1

If you are not sure where the abuser’s gun is and you think that the abuser could have access to it, it is a good idea to consider making a safety plan. See our Safety Tips page to learn more about how to increase your safety. You can also contact a local domestic violence organization for additional help. Visit our CO Advocates and Shelters page to find a local domestic violence organization near you.

1 C.R.S.A. § 16-13-311

The abuser uses a gun for his/her job. Does the law still apply?

Maybe. If the abuser is a law enforcement officer, military employee or government official, then s/he might be able to continue to use his/her gun for work purposes, but not for personal use.

However, if the abuser has been convicted of a felony or a domestic violence misdemeanor, then under federal law, the abuser cannot buy or have a gun, even if s/he is a police officer or a military employee.1

If you are confused or not sure whether your abuser can still use a gun for work purposes, you can talk to a domestic violence advocate in your area or call the National Center on Protection Orders and Full Faith & Credit to find out more information: 1-800-903-0111 x 2.

To find a domestic violence advocate in your area, please go to our CO Advocates and Shelters page.

1 18 USC § 925(a)(1)

I read through all of this information and I'm still confused. What can I do?

Trying to understand both federal and state law can be confusing, but there are people out there who can help you better understand the law and your rights under the law.

  • You can contact the National Center on Protection Orders and Full Faith & Credit to get more information about the federal firearm law and how it applies to you: 1-800-903-0111 x 2.
  • You can write to our Email Hotline.
  • You can contact a local domestic violence organization in your area - see our CO Advocates and Shelters page.