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: Hawái

State Gun Laws

Actualizada: 
5 de agosto de 2021

I do not have a protective order against the abuser, and s/he has not been convicted of a crime. Can s/he have a gun?

Even if you do not have a protective order against the abuser and s/he has not been convicted of any crime, Hawaii state law makes it illegal to buy or have a firearm if a person does not have a permit. To qualify for a permit, a person:

  • has to be 21 years or older, unless they are 18 or over and have a valid hunter’s license;
  • must have completed an approved safety course;
  • has to be a United States Citizen or a qualified alien; and
  • must not be otherwise disqualified for one of the reasons mentioned below.1

Also, Hawaii state law says that a person cannot have or buy a gun if s/he:

  • is a fugitive from justice;
  • is or has been under treatment for addiction to a dangerous drug, unless the person has been medically documented to no longer have the addiction;
  • has been found not guilty of a crime because of a mental disorder, unless the person has been medically documented to no longer have the mental disorder;
  • has been diagnosed with a serious behavioral, emotional, or mental disorder, unless the person has been medically documented to no longer have the mental disorder;
  • is under 25 and was found by a family court, as a juvenile, to have committed:
    • a felony;
    • two or more crimes of violence, or
    • an illegal sale of any drug;
  • is under 18 and:
    • is under treatment for addiction to a dangerous drug, unless the person has been medically documented to no longer have the addiction;
    • is a fugitive from justice;
    • has been determined to not be responsible for a crime because of a mental disorder, unless the person has been medically documented to no longer have the mental disorder; or
    • has been committed to an institution due to a mental disorder, disease, or defect, unless the person has been medically documented to no longer have the mental disorder.2

If none of these situations apply, you can still make a plan for your safety. See our Safety Tips page for more information. You can also contact your local domestic violence organization for additional help. You may want to talk to them about whether leaving the area - either long term or for a little while - might help improve your safety. See our HI Advocates and Shelters page to find a local domestic violence organization near you.

For additional information on gun laws in Hawaii, you can go to the Giffords Law Center website.

Also, federal laws, which apply to all states, restrict an abuser’s right to have a gun under other circumstances. Go to Federal Gun Laws to get more information.

1 Haw. Rev. Stat. § 134-2(a), (d)
2 Haw. Rev. Stat. § 134-7

I've read through all of this information, and I am still confused. What can I do?

Trying to understand both federal and state law can be confusing, but there are people out there who can help you better understand the law and your rights under the law.

  • You can contact the National Center on Protection Orders and Full Faith & Credit to get more information about the federal firearm law and how it applies to you: 1-800-903-0111, ext. 2.
  • You can contact a local domestic violence organization in your area - see our HI Advocates and Shelters page.
  • You can write to our Email Hotline.