WomensLaw is not just for women. We serve and support all survivors, no matter their sex or gender.

Important: Even if courts are closed, you can still file for a protection order and other emergency relief. See our FAQ on Courts and COVID-19.

Legal Information: North Carolina

Housing Laws

Updated: 
October 13, 2020

If I am a victim, can a landlord refuse to rent me an apartment or kick me out of my apartment?

In North Carolina, landlords are prohibited from discriminating against victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. This means that a landlord cannot end a lease, refuse to renew a lease, or refuse to enter into a rental agreement with you because you or a household member of yours is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Also, the landlord cannot treat you (the tenant) differently than s/he treats other tenants who are not victims of abuse. For example, s/he cannot refuse to make needed repairs in your apartment because you are an abuse victim.

Note: The landlord also cannot discriminate against you if you terminated your lease early due to the fact that you are a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking.1 For information on how to end your lease early, go to If I am a victim, can I terminate (end) my lease early?

1 NCGS § 42-42.2