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Legal Information: Missouri

State Gun Laws

Updated: 
November 14, 2019

Is there anything I can do to make it more likely that the abuser's gun is taken away when I get an order of protection?

While it does not need to be written on your order of protection that the abuser cannot buy or have a gun in order for the federal law to be enforced, it may make it easier if it is written.

Here are some suggestions of what you may want to do:

  • If the abuser has a gun, tell the judge how many guns s/he has, and if s/he has ever threatened you with a gun(s).
  • Ask the judge to check the boxes on the order of protection form that says the abuser (respondent) must surrender his/her guns and/or that the respondent’s firearm license is suspended or revoked. If the judge agrees to do so, look to make sure that the boxes are checked on your order before leaving the courthouse.

If the judge takes away the guns, you may also want to ask the judge to:

  • Require the abuser to give his/her guns to the police, or require the police to go to the abuser’s house and get them.
  • Explain what will happen to the abuser’s guns (where they will be held, etc.).
  • Make it clear to both you and the abuser how long the guns will be kept away from the abuser.
  • Order that the police notify you when the guns are returned to the abuser.1

1 Americans for Gun Safety; “Domestic Violence and Guns: A Guide to Laws that can Remove Guns from a Domestic Abuser.” Note: This organization is now called Third Way, and no longer publishes this article on their site.