Legal Information: Kentucky

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
September 21, 2017

What protections can I get in an interpersonal protective order?

In a temporary or final interpersonal protective order, the judge can order that the abuser not:

  • commit any acts of dating violence and abuse, stalking, or sexual assault;
  • contact you or any other person identified by the judge;
  • throw away or damage any of your property;
  • come within 500 feet of you and any other person identified in the order; and/or
  • come within a specific distance of your home, school, workplace, or other place you go to frequently. (Note: When asking the judge to restrict the abuser from a place to which you frequently go, the judge will first hear testimony from you and the abuser about the location and only restrict the abuser from areas where there is a specific, definite danger to you or another person protected by the order.)1

The judge can also order any other conditions that s/he believes would prevent future acts of dating violence and abuse, stalking, or sexual assault, but the judge cannot order that you (the petitioner) do any particular actions.2 In dating violence and abuse cases, the judge can order that you and/or the abuser receive counseling services available in the community.3

1 KRS § 456.060(1)(a),(2)(a),(b)
2 KRS § 456.060(1)(b)
3 KRS § 456.060(1)(c)