Legal Information: Kentucky

Housing Laws

Updated: 
September 29, 2021

How does this law affect the person against whom I have the protective order or no contact order (the “named individual”)?

If you changed your lock under this housing law, a landlord can refuse to provide the named individual a key to the new lock on your rental property (regardless of what is included in the lease or rental agreement). Additionally, a named individual who has been excluded from the property as part of the protective order or no contact order is still responsible for rent.1

Regardless of whether the named individual is a party to the lease or rental agreement, s/he is considered to have “interfered” with the (terminated) lease or rental agreement between you and your landlord and s/he can be held liable in civil court for money damages that the landlord suffers for early termination of your lease.2

If you and the person against whom you have the protective order or no contact order are co-tenants, the landlord also has the right to refuse to allow the named individual access to the rental property and the landlord can pursue all available legal remedies against the named individual including lease termination, eviction, and suing for money damages.3

1 K.R.S. § 383.300(4)(a)(2)
2 K.R.S. § 383.300(5)(d)
3 K.R.S. § 383.300(6)

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